Christ Church Cathedral Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements

Safeguarding

Concerns related to safeguarding in the Cathedral should be reported to the Chapter Safeguarding Officer, Professor Graham Ward (graham.ward@chch.ox.ac.uk).

The Cathedral’s Safeguarding Policy is available below in an accessible text format, a PDF version of the Cathedral's Safeguarding Policy can be downloaded here, along with our Visitor Guide and Volunteer Guide, and guidance about online teaching.

For further information about safeguarding at Christ Church, see the main Safeguarding webpage.

Note that there are separate safeguarding policies and procedures here for the Cathedral Choir and Christ Church Cathedral School.


Revised April 2020

‘The care and protection of children, young people and vulnerable adults involved in Church activities is the responsibility of the whole Church. Everyone who participates in the life of the Church has a role to play in promoting a Safer Church for all.’ (from the introduction to Promoting a Safer Church, CoE, 2017)

This document will be reviewed, revised (as required) and approved as part of the Cathedral’s safeguarding annual review process

Version

Date

Reviewed by

Approved by

Date of next review

V 1

April 2019

N/A

 

April 2020

V 2

April 2020

EJN, GW

EJN, GW

April 2021

V2.1 April 2020 (Contacts update July 2021) SRH   April 2021

Contents

Section

1.    Introduction
2.    Safeguarding policy statement, foundations and key principles
3.    Requirements, responsibilities and guidance
4.    Promoting a safe environment and preventing harm
5.    Responding to concerns
6.    Pastoral care and support
7.    Information management and record keeping
8.    Links to other bodies and related policies and procedures
9.    Governance: continuing to develop effective safeguarding arrangements
10.  Conclusion

Appendices

A.  Key contact numbers
B.  Safeguarding at CCC: summary of key roles and responsibilities; training requirements; lines of accountability; agreement with the Diocese of Oxford
C.  Essential knowledge: definitions, signs and symptoms, ‘contextual’ safeguarding
D.  Templates for reporting and recording
E.  Charity Commission – 10 actions trustee boards need to take to ensure good safeguarding
F.   Codes of Conduct
G.  Christ Church Cathedral School - Additional Safeguarding Children procedures pertaining to the Music Department 2010 revised 2020
H.   Frideswide Voices - Additional Safeguarding Children procedures pertaining to the Music Department
I.    Reporting Concerns about Church Officers (staff or volunteers) or others (‘whistleblowing policy’)
J.   Record of Concern Form
K.  References and resources

NB: In view of the COVID-19 crisis, guidance for online teaching and rehearsals has been issued by both Christ Church Cathedral Choir and Frideswide Voices.

This guidance is available on the Cathedral website: https://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/oxford-cathedral

1.  Introduction

Statement by the Sub Dean

1.1  Welcome to this overview of the safeguarding responsibilities that we all share in the life of our Cathedral.

This Safeguarding Policy, together with its accompanying Procedures and Arrangements and the shorter companion guides, sets out our commitment to safeguarding, to the safer recruitment of all our staff and volunteers, to ongoing training and raising of awareness, and indicates how we follow up of concerns.

This Policy is reviewed by the Cathedral’s Chapter each year and updated accordingly when any changes are needed.

The Revd Canon Graham Ward is the Chapter Safeguarding Officer, and the Cathedral Secretary is the Cathedral Safeguarding Lead. In their absence, the Canon in Residence will fulfil this role. Helem Smee is also the Designated Safeguarding Lead for Frideswide Voices. 

Safeguarding awareness training is mandatory for all our volunteers and staff, at a level appropriate to your range of activities, work and responsibility, so please make sure you are familiar with the sections that are relevant to you.

The key message for us all is to `be alert’. Properly understanding and applying these measures is a key part of our responsibility in stewarding the gifts and resources entrusted to us, as we continue to look and work for the coming of God’s kingdom among us, and being knowledgeable about what to look out for and how to raise concerns can make all the difference to a child or vulnerable person in need.

The Revd Canon Richard Peers, Sub Dean

1.2  This document, approved and adopted by the Christ Church Cathedral Chapter in  February 2020, sets out the safeguarding policy, procedures, guidance, structures, systems and governance (to be referred to as the ‘safeguarding arrangements’) for Christ Church Cathedral. The House of Bishops’ safeguarding policy statement and the contact details of those at the Cathedral with specific safeguarding responsibilities is displayed in the vicinity of the Cathedral in poster form. Three further guides have been produced:

  • Safeguarding at Christ Church Cathedral: Guide for Staff and Volunteers
  • Safeguarding at Christ Church Cathedral: Guide for Visitors
  • Safeguarding at Christ Church Cathedral: Quick Reference Guide

These are drawn directly from the information in this document and are available on the Cathedral website.

1.3  Please note that the recommended way to view this full document is in electronic form accessed from the Cathedral website so that ‘hypertext links’ to reference material can be followed and anyone consulting the document can be confident that the latest, dated, version is being used.

1.4  This document follows a review of the Cathedral safeguarding arrangements and a significant revision in policy, procedure and arrangements subsequent to the revision and publication of national statutory safeguarding guidance by the Government in 2018; the publication of policy and practice guidance by the Church of England (CoE) at a national level on behalf of the House of Bishops; and, revised and enhanced guidance from the Charity Commission as the regulatory body for charities.

1.5  To ensure future compliance with safeguarding requirements and best practice it is  recommended (in section 8 below: Governance: continuing to develop effective safeguarding arrangements) that a review of the Cathedral’s safeguarding arrangements and related documentation is undertaken at least annually, or sooner as required in the event of significant changes in: the national legislative and statutory framework, or in the policy or practice guidance issued by the Church of England, or in guidance issued by the Charity Commission.  Revisions and changes will be made to all three of the new Cathedral safeguarding documents (including updating links to external documentation and guidance) and approved as necessary by Chapter.

2.  Safeguarding Policy statement, foundations and key principles

‘The care and protection of children, young people and vulnerable adults involved in Church activities is the responsibility of the whole Church. Everyone who participates in the life of the Church has a role to play in promoting a Safer Church for all.’  (from the introduction to Promoting a Safer Church 2017)

2.1  In October 2018, the Chapter of Christ Church Cathedral adopted the Safeguarding policy statement for children, young people and adults: Promoting a Safer Church (House of Bishops) 2017 all Church of England organisations are invited to do. Links to the full documents can be found in Appendix I.

2.2  This policy statement begins with a recognition that:

The care and protection of children, young people and vulnerable adults involved in Church activities is the responsibility of the whole Church. Everyone who participates in the life of the Church has a role to play in promoting a Safer Church for all.

2.3  The Introduction to the policy also represents the intention and commitment of the Cathedral:

The Church of England, its archbishops, bishops, clergy and leaders are committed to safeguarding as an integral part of the life and ministry of the Church.

Safeguarding means the action the Church takes to promote a safer culture. This means we will promote the welfare of children, young people and adults, work to prevent abuse from occurring, seek to protect those that are at risk of being abused and respond well to those that have been abused. We will take care to identify where a person may present a risk to others, and offer support to them whilst taking steps to mitigate such risks.

The Church of England affirms the ‘Whole Church’ approach to safeguarding. This approach encompasses a commitment to consistent policy and practice across all Church bodies, Church Officers and that everyone associated with the Church, who comes into contact with children, young people and adults, has a role to play.

The Church will take appropriate steps to maintain a safer environment for all and to practice fully and positively Christ's Ministry towards children, young people and adults; to respond sensitively and compassionately to their needs in order to help keep them safe from harm.

2.4  Promoting a Safer Church sets out five ‘foundations’ that provide the current underpinning for safeguarding work across the Church:

The Gospel: …Being faithful to our call to share the gospel therefore compels us to take with the utmost seriousness the challenge of preventing abuse from happening and responding well where it has.

Human Rights and the Law: …Safeguarding work is undertaken within a legislative framework supported by government guidance which sets out a range of safeguarding duties, responsibilities and best practice.

Core principles:

  • The welfare of the child, young person and vulnerable adult is paramount;
  • Integrity, respect and listening to all;
  • Transparency and openness;
  • Accountability;
  • Collaboration with key statutory authorities and other partners;
  • Use of professional safeguarding advice and support both inside and outside the Church;
  • A commitment to the prevention of abuse;
  • The active management of risk;
  • Promoting a culture of informed vigilance;
  • Regular evaluation to ensure best practice.

Good Safeguarding Practice: The following key features will help Church bodies promote and maintain a safer culture that protects and promotes the welfare of children, young people and vulnerable adults.These features are:

  • A leadership commitment, at all levels, to the importance of safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children, young people and vulnerable adults;
  • A safeguarding policy available to Church Officers;
  • A clear line of accountability within the Church for work on safeguarding;
  • Clear reporting procedures to deal with safeguarding concerns and allegations;
  • Clear roles for Church Officers;
  • Practice and services informed by on-going learning, review and by the views of children, young people, families and vulnerable adults;
  • Safer recruitment procedures in place;
  • Clear arrangements for support and/or supervision;
  • Safeguarding training for all Church Officers working with or in contact with children, young people and/or vulnerable adults;
  • Effective working with statutory and voluntary sector partners;
  • Publicly advertised arrangements for children, young people and vulnerable adults to be able to speak to an independent person, as required;
  • Complaints and whistleblowing procedures that are well publicised;
  • Effective information sharing;
  • Good record keeping.

Learning from the past: …The statutory reports and independent reviews into abuse that have involved the Church of England and other faith organisations highlight past errors and significant lessons to be learnt to improve safeguarding.  As a Church we continue to commit to a journey of truth, healing, learning and abuse prevention.

2.5  In adopting the national policy and basing safeguarding arrangements on the foundations above, the Church of England and the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church Cathedral also commit to following the six policy areas to structure its safeguarding arrangements, practice and procedures:

  1. Promoting a safer environment and culture;
  2. Safely recruiting and supporting all those with any responsibility related to children and vulnerable adults within the Church;
  3. Responding promptly to every safeguarding concern or allegation;
  4. Caring pastorally for victims/survivors of abuse and other affected persons;
  5. Caring pastorally for those who are the subject of concerns or allegations of abuse and other affected persons;
  6. Responding to those that may pose a present risk to others.

These policy areas are referenced throughout the document where appropriate.

2.6  Thus, this document seeks to set out the way the Cathedral will build on the firm foundations and realise the six statements in its life and work whilst also meeting the requirements and expectations of:

  1. the legal and statutory framework (England and Wales) relating to safeguarding children and adults;
  2. the specific recent extensive practice guidance issued by the Church of England; and,
  3. the requirements of the regulatory body for charities, the Charity Commission.  

2.7  Each section of this document includes an introduction to the relevant information and guidance in essential documents from the three sources above. It is recognised that information and guidance is likely to continue to develop and change and the Cathedral safeguarding procedures, guidance and arrangements will need to be updated accordingly. However, this version of the Cathedral Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements is the first developed since the programme of significant change in the safeguarding arrangements for the whole CoE and, especially, since the publication in 2017 of several practice guidance documents to support the national policy and adopted by the House of Bishops.

2.8  In approving and adopting this document, the Chapter of Christ Church Cathedral and those with a specific safeguarding role confirm that operational practice will comply with the legislation, statutory guidance and the practice guidance produced by the Church of England and the Church’s National Safeguarding Team (unless it is considered that national legislative and statutory guidance takes precedence).  

2.9  Please note that various terms relating to safeguarding matters and arrangements are used in this document. A useful guide to such terms and definitions, both those that relate to a specific church/cathedral context and more widely relating to safeguarding, can be found in the Church of England’s national document Glossary reference document (2017) and the definitions in that document are the ones used unless otherwise indicated or referenced.  

Links to the full list of documents can be found in Appendix I.

3.  Requirements, responsibilities and guidance

‘Safeguarding work is undertaken within a legislative framework supported by government guidance which sets out a range of safeguarding duties, responsibilities and best practice’ (from the five ‘foundations’: Promoting a Safer Church 2017)

‘…those with any responsibility related to children and vulnerable adults within the church’ (from the six safeguarding statements: Promoting a Safer Church 2017)  

3.1  Introduction

3.1.1  This section aims to provide an outline of requirements, guidance, responsibilities and roles to ensure effective safeguarding arrangements and related practice of the Cathedral staff and volunteers.

3.1.2  The guidance from the three primary reference sources (national legal and statutory framework; the Church of England; the Charity Commission) is extensive.  Core information and principles from these sources are set out in sections 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 and 3.5 respectively, but accessing the full documents and especially the CoE national practice guidance is advocated in practice (e.g: when recruiting, in relation to DBS checks, when responding to a safeguarding concern or allegation, when considering making a referral to the police or children’s or adults’  services, when reporting a serious incident to the Charity Commission etc.) and hyperlinks are included to assist this. The inclusion of direct links and references (see Appendix I) to external sources and documents can help ensure that prevention, recognition and response to any safeguarding concerns that arise will be based on the most up-to-date guidance and information.  Checking and updating these links and the guidance documentation that governs safeguarding practice should be part of the proposed annual review, revision and reporting arrangements.

3.2  The legal and statutory framework (England and Wales) relating to safeguarding children and adults - overview

3.2.1  The underpinning legislation (for England and Wales) and related statutory guidance of relevance for safeguarding addresses both safeguarding children and young people, safeguarding adults and related areas, and the following represents some of the current key documents that should now inform all organisations’ policy, procedures and practices:

Safeguarding children and young people

3.2.2  Working Together to Safeguard Children (July 2018) (links to the full list of documents can be found in Appendix I) is the primary statutory guidance document and includes effective guidance on the implementation of relevant law (i.e: Children Act 1989 and subsequent legislation). It includes guidance regarding assessing need and providing help for children and young people; processes and procedures on ‘managing individual cases’ including referral to social care, the police and/or the local authority designated officer in the event of allegations against staff or volunteers; organisational responsibilities; Local Safeguarding Children Board arrangements; a glossary including definitions and an outline of legislation, etc.).

3.2.3  Within Working Together (2018) there are links to other related and relevant guidance e.g:

  • Information sharing: advice for practitioners providing safeguarding services to children, young people, parents and carers
  • Keeping Children Safe in Education (2018)
  • Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (October 2015)    
  • Child sexual exploitation: definition and guide for practitioners
  • Preventing and tackling bullying
  • National action plan to tackle child abuse linked to faith and belief
  • Sexual violence and sexual harassment between children in schools and colleges
  • Disclosure and Barring Services
  • DBS barring referral guidance
  • Multi-agency public protection arrangements
  • Radicalisation – Prevent Strategy
  • ThinkUKnow (Supporting children to stay safe online)
  • Child maltreatment: when to suspect maltreatment in under 18s (NICE guidelines updated 2018)
  • Whistleblowing advice line (NSPCC)
    etc… 

NB: If access is required to these many supporting documents, then follow the hypertext links from Working Together 2018 to reach the current national documents.  

Safeguarding adults

3.2.4  The Care and Support Statutory Guidance (2018) (a full list of documents can be found in Appendix I) is the primary statutory guidance document regarding the safeguarding of adults and provides guidance on the implementation of relevant legislation, the main act being the Care Act 2014. Section 14 of the Care and Support Statutory Guidance (2018) refers to safeguarding and includes:

3.2.5  Six key principles underpin all adult safeguarding work:

  1. Empowerment - People being supported and encouraged to make their own decisions and informed consent.
  2. Prevention - It is better to take action before harm occurs.
  3. Proportionality - The least intrusive response appropriate to the risk presented.
  4. Protection - Support and representation for those in greatest need.
  5. Partnership - Local solutions through services working with their communities. Communities have a part to play in preventing, detecting and reporting neglect and abuse.
  6. Accountability - Accountability and transparency in safeguarding practice.

3.2.6  Section 14:17 of the Care and Support Statutory Guidance (2018) has helpful information relating to definitions, ‘signs and symptoms’ and these are included in Appendix C and the Safeguarding at Christ Church Cathedral: Guide for Staff and Volunteers.   Section 14:52 includes a checklist for effective adult safeguarding policies and procedures that might be used to inform the continued development of the safeguarding arrangements of the Cathedral.

Other national legislation and statutory guidance relevant to children, young people and adults

3.2.7  Other legislation and associated guidance of relevance for both safeguarding children/young people and adults includes:

  • Equality Act 2010
  • Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 and related Disclosure and Barring Service arrangements
  • Regulated activity in relation to children: scope. Factual note by HM Government
  • Voyeurism (Offences) Act 2019
  • A Guide to Child Workforce Roles (v.9)
  • A Guide to Adult Workforce Roles (v.9)
  • Mental Capacity Act 2005
  • Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 and the Revised Prevent Duty Guidance: for England and Wales (2015)  
  • Data Protection legislation and GDPR and related Guide to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (June 2018) – online version has ‘live’ updates and additional guidance.

Links to these documents can be found in Appendix I.

3.3  The legal and statutory framework (England and Wales) relating to safeguarding children and adults – additional detail

3.3.1  The current version of Working Together (published in 2018) provides specific guidance for voluntary, charity, social enterprise, faith-based organisations and private sectors in Chapter 2 (see extract below), paragraphs 57-62/p.71&72.

3.3.2  The key phrase is to be found in Chapter 2, para 62:

    ‘Every VCSE, faith-based organisation and private sector organisation or agency should have in place the arrangements described in this chapter.’

3.3.3  The section specifically addressing the requirements of ‘Voluntary, charity, social enterprise, faith-based organisations and private sectors’ makes an overt reference to the Charity Commission and guidance that the charity sector regulator provides. (See also section 3.5 below)

From Working Together 2018, Chapter 2:

Voluntary, charity, social enterprise, faith-based organisations and private sector

57. Voluntary, charity, social enterprise (VCSE) and private sector organisations and agencies play an important role in safeguarding children through the services they deliver. Some of these will work with particular communities, with different races and faith communities and delivering in health, adult social care, housing, prisons and probation services. They may as part of their work provide a wide range of activities for children and have an important role in safeguarding children and supporting families and communities.

58. Like other organisations and agencies who work with children, they should have appropriate arrangements in place to safeguard and protect children from harm. Many of these organisations and agencies as well as many schools, children’s centres, early years and childcare organisations, will be subject to charity law and regulated either by the Charity Commission or other “principal” regulators. Charity trustees are responsible for ensuring that those benefiting from, or working with, their charity, are not harmed in any way through contact with it. The Charity Commission for England and Wales provides guidance on charity compliance which should be followed. Further information on the Charity Commission’s role in safeguarding can be found on: the Charity Commission's page on gov.uk.org (NB: hyperlink is included in Working Together 2018)

59. Some of these organisations and agencies are large national charities whilst others will have a much smaller local reach. Some will be delivering statutory services and may be run by volunteers, such as library services. This important group of organisations includes youth services not delivered by local authorities or district councils.

60. All practitioners working in these organisations and agencies who are working with children and their families are subject to the same safeguarding responsibilities, whether paid or a volunteer.                               

61. Every VCSE, faith-based organisation and private sector organisation or agency should have policies in place to safeguard and protect children from harm. These should be followed and systems should be in place to ensure compliance in this. Individual practitioners, whether paid or volunteer, should be aware of their responsibilities for safeguarding and protecting children from harm, how they should respond to child protection concerns and how to make a referral to local authority children’s social care or the police if necessary.

62. Every VCSE, faith-based organisation and private sector organisation or agency should have in place the arrangements described in this chapter. *  They should be aware of how they need to work with the safeguarding partners in a local area. Charities (within the meaning of section 1 Charities Act 2011), religious organisations (regulation 34 and schedule 3 to School Admissions) and any person involved in the provision, supervision or oversight of sport or leisure are included within the relevant agency regulations. This means if the safeguarding partners name them as a relevant partner they must cooperate. Other VCSE, faith-based and private sector organisations not on the list of relevant agencies can also be asked to cooperate as part of the local arrangements and should do so.

Thus, all organisations need to familiarise themselves with Chapter 2 and use this as the basis for developing and evaluating their safeguarding arrangements.

3.3.4  From: Care and Support Statutory Guidance 2018, Section 14. Whilst the Care and Support Statutory Guidance (2018) (a link to the documentation is included in Appendix I) seems less explicit about the overall requirements of organisations but, as noted above, it includes the following which can serve as a checklist for policies and procedures:

14.52 In any organisation, there should be adult safeguarding policies and procedures. These should reflect this statutory guidance and the decision making tree (diagram 1B following para. 14.92) and are for use locally to support the reduction or removal of safeguarding risks, as well as to secure any support to protect the adult and, where necessary, to help the adult recover and develop resilience. Such policies and procedures should assist those working with adults how to develop swift and personalised safeguarding responses and how to involve adults in this decision making. This, in turn, should encourage proportionate responses and improve outcomes for the people concerned.

Procedures may include:

  • a statement of purpose relating to promoting wellbeing, preventing harm and responding effectively if concerns are raised;

  • a statement of roles and responsibility, authority and accountability sufficiently specific to ensure that all staff and volunteers understand their role and limitations;

  • a statement of the procedures for dealing with allegations of abuse, including those for dealing with emergencies by ensuring immediate safety, the processes for initially assessing abuse and neglect and deciding when intervention is appropriate, and the arrangements for reporting to the police, urgently when necessary;

  • a full list of points of referral indicating how to access support and advice at all times, whether in normal working hours or outside them, with a comprehensive list of contact addresses and telephone numbers, including relevant national and local voluntary bodies;

  • an indication of how to record allegations of abuse and neglect, any enquiry and all subsequent action;

  • a list of sources of expert advice;

  • a full description of channels of inter-agency communication and procedures for information sharing and for decision making;

  • a list of all services which might offer access to support or redress;

  • how professional disagreements are resolved especially with regard to whether decisions should be made, enquiries undertaken.

3.4  Church of England national safeguarding information, requirements and expectations

3.4.1  As National Lead for Safeguarding, the Bishop of Bath and Wells, notes in the introduction to the Church of England Safeguarding Review (2017) document:

Large numbers of children, young people and adults attend our churches through clubs, drop-ins, services and a whole range of other activities, every day of the week; this is where safeguarding is worked out and church policies and practices have to be designed for this.

In the past few years safeguarding in the Church of England has undergone a programme of significant change. In 2015 a National Safeguarding Team (NST) was established to support our dioceses, parishes, churches and worshipping communities to be safer places for all.’ 

3.4.2  The ‘programme of significant change’, referred to above, has included the review, revision and greater formalisation of central policy, procedures and guidance relevant for all CoE bodies/organisations, including cathedrals.

3.4.3  The following documents and their content provide the practice guidance that the Cathedral will follow and, along with the national statutory guidance and Charity Commission guidance, provide the substance for the Cathedral’s safeguarding arrangements. Thus, in this document, relevant sections are noted, links to the full national policy and practice guidance made where appropriate, and some implications for the safeguarding work of the Cathedral illustrated. 

3.4.4  House of Bishops, safeguarding review, policies, procedures, and national safeguarding requirements/expectations e.g:

CoE Safeguarding Overview (2017) includes six safeguarding commitments from the House of Bishops and for the whole Church:

  • Promoting a safer environment and culture;
  • Safely recruiting and supporting all those with any responsibility related to children and vulnerable adults within the Church;
  • Responding promptly to every safeguarding concern or allegation;
  • Caring pastorally for victims/survivors of abuse and other affected persons;
  • Caring pastorally for those who are the subject of concerns or allegations of abuse and other affected persons;
  • Responding to those that may pose a present risk to others.

‘Safeguarding in our cathedrals’ is addressed on p. 10 of the overview report:

‘All our cathedrals have access to a safeguarding adviser, working closely with the diocese. Stephen Lake is Dean of Gloucester and a member of the National Safeguarding Steering Group.  He represents cathedrals at a national level and is working with the NST on cathedral-centred policies that recognise a cathedral’s unique safeguarding responsibilities.’

“Cathedrals are different to parishes. They don’t just have established regular congregations and they are open at all times; people can come and go as they please. They often deal with a large number of children, visitors and volunteers and hold varied services every day.

Together these elements of cathedral life present unique safeguarding responsibilities that we must meet. Cathedrals are aware of their unique position and the risks associated with that and seek to administer their safeguarding provisions appropriately. It is vital that we encourage our cathedrals to work in partnership and close relationship with others, to ensure they have access to professional safeguarding provision at all times. This might include their diocese, local authority and other statutory bodies.”
 
3.4.5  In addition to the Safeguarding Overview (2017), the following policy statements and practice guidance have been issued:

Policy statements:

  • Promoting a Safer Church: House of Bishops’ Statement (2017)

  • Protecting All God’s Children (2010 4th ed.)

Practice Guidance:

  • Glossary reference document (2017)

  • Key roles and responsibilities of church office holders and bodies practice guidance (2017) NB: this replaces the section relating to roles and responsibilities in Protecting All God’s Children (2010, above)

  • Practice Guidance Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017)

  • Responding well to domestic abuse practice guidance (2017)

  • Training and development practice guidance (2017)

  • Safer recruitment practice guidance (2016)

  • Responding well to those who have been sexually abused (2011)

  • Safeguarding in religious communities (2015)

3.5  The requirements of the regulatory body for charities, the Charity Commission 

3.5.1  The Cathedral forms one element of the charity: The Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford of the Foundation of King Henry VIII and as such is registered and regulated by the Charity Commission. The Charity Commission has also been reviewing and revising guidance and practice in relation to safeguarding matters. Several situations that have attracted media and public attention in recent years serve as a reminder of the vital importance of having effective safeguarding arrangements in charities – especially to safeguard all ‘beneficiaries’ of charities, including staff and volunteers; but also to safeguard the very reputation of any charity.

3.5.2  As noted in section 3.3.3 the revised statutory guidance Working Together 2018 includes the following under the heading Voluntary, charity, social enterprise, faith-based organisations and private sectors in Chapter 2:

58. Like other organisations and agencies who work with children, they should have appropriate arrangements in place to safeguard and protect children from harm. Many of these organisations and agencies as well as many schools, children’s centres, early years and childcare organisations, will be subject to charity law and regulated either by the Charity Commission or other “principal” regulators. Charity trustees are responsible for ensuring that those benefiting from, or working with, their charity, are not harmed in any way through contact with it. The Charity Commission for England and Wales provides guidance on charity compliance which should be followed. Further information on the Charity Commission’s role in safeguarding can be found on the Charity Commission's page on Gov.uk.

3.5.3  The Charity Commission has recently published 10 Actions trustee boards need to take to ensure good safeguarding governance.

This guide is reproduced in Appendix E.

3.5.4  The following documents and guidance have been issued by the Charity Commission:

  • Essential Trustee: 6 main duties the essential trustee: what you need to know, what you need to do (May 2018)
  • Safeguarding and protecting people for charities and trustees (Updated October 2018)
  • Regulatory and Risk Framework (Feb, 2018)
  • Strategy for dealing with safeguarding issues in charities (Dec. 2017)
  • Tackling abuse and mismanagement 2016-2017: full report
  • How to report a serious incident in your charity (Sept. 2017) and Table of examples Deciding what to report

Links to these publications are included in Appendix I.

3.5.5  The Charity Commission promotes four clear expectations of charities:

•    The importance of:

  • Providing a safe and trusted environment which safeguards anyone who comes into contact with it including staff and beneficiaries;
  • Setting an organisational culture that prioritises safeguarding, so it is safe for those affected to come forward and report incidents and concerns with the assurance they will be handled sensitively and properly;
  • Having adequate safeguarding policies, procedures and measures to protect people;
  • How incidents and allegations will be handled should they arise, including reporting to the relevant authorities, including the police where appropriate and the Commission.

3.5.6  The Commission has a specific regulatory role in relation to safeguarding, which is focused on the conduct of trustees and the steps they take to protect beneficiaries and other persons who come into contact with the charity. This role and the Commission’s approach to it are explained in more detail in its published Strategy for dealing with safeguarding issues in charities. (A link to this publication is included in Appendix I) 

Safeguarding is considered a priority regulatory risk issue by the Charity Commission. (From the Charity Commission’s Risk and Regulatory Framework Annex A) 

3.5.7  The Charity Commission defines a ‘safeguarding’ matter as:

Serious harm to, and the abuse of, children or adults in connection with a charity and/or the failure by a charity that works with or has regular contact with children or adults at risk to have adequate and effective safeguarding policies and procedures in place.     

(From the Charity Commission’s Risk and Regulatory Framework 2018 Annex A)

3.5.8  Potential ‘risk’ indicators cited in the Annex A include:

  • Charities set up for illegal or improper purposes or having association with criminality;
  • Lack of records, or proper systems and controls in relation to safeguarding, including registration with another regulator where that is required;
  • Nature of the trustee body, including:
  • disqualified individuals
  • competence
  • significantly poor governance.

3.6  Specific Church and Cathedral safeguarding roles and responsibilities

3.6.1  The national CoE document: Key Roles and Responsibilities of Church Office Holders and Bodies Practice Guidance (Dec 2017). (A link to this publication is included in Appendix I) recognises that:
The Church of England is not a single entity. Rather, it consists of many essentially autonomous office holders and other bodies, including both ancient ecclesiastical corporations and modern statutory corporations (many of which are charities). This complex structure and consequent dispersal of authority over a number of bodies and institutions, has a significant impact on the way in which responsibility for safeguarding matters is exercised.   (Introduction)

3.6.2  The introduction also notes:

Under section 5 of the Safeguarding and Clergy Discipline Measure 20163, all authorised clergy, bishops, archdeacons, licensed readers and lay workers, churchwardens and PCCs must have ‘due regard’ to safeguarding guidance issued by the House of Bishops (this will include both policy and practice guidance). A duty to have ‘due regard’ to guidance means that the person under the duty is not free to disregard it but is required to follow it unless there are cogent reasons for not doing so (‘Cogent’ for this purpose means clear, logical and convincing). Failure by clergy to comply with the duty imposed by the 2016 Measure may result in disciplinary action. This duty applies to the main guidance document. It does not apply to the appendices which are good practice reference material and templates. The Ecclesiastical Insurance Group has made it clear that their insurance cover is only valid where House of Bishops’ safeguarding policy and practice guidance is being followed.

3.6.3  The Key Roles and Responsibilities of Church Office Holders and Bodies Practice Guidance (Dec 2017) document provides details of the roles and responsibilities of:

  • Archbishops (1.1)
  • The House of Bishops (1.2)
  • National Lead Safeguarding Bishop (1.3)
  • General Synod (1.6)
  • National Safeguarding Steering Group (1.7)
  • National Safeguarding Team (1.8)
  • National Safeguarding Panel (1.9)
  • Diocesan Bishop (2.1)
  • Diocesan Safeguarding Advisory Panel (2.4)
  • Diocesan Safeguarding Advisor (2.6)

3.6.4  Section 5 of Key Roles and Responsibilities of Church Office Holders and Bodies Practice Guidance (Dec 2017) addresses roles and responsibilities relating to Cathedrals and includes much that is of relevance for the safeguarding arrangements at Christ Church Cathedral (e.g: in relation to the Chapter), but it is recognised that the Cathedral more directly comes under the guidance in section 6: ‘Peculiars’, and it is noted that ‘peculiars’:

Sit(s) outside diocesan and provincial structures and are not subject to visitation by the bishop or archbishop. This gives them considerable independence.

Nevertheless, it is advised that:

…in relation to safeguarding, peculiars adopt the House of Bishops’ safeguarding policy and practice guidance and the roles and responsibilities that relate to other similar sized Church bodies e.g. a cathedral or a parish.

The Key Roles and Responsibilities of Church Office Holders and Bodies Practice Guidance (Dec 2017) document should be consulted for specific detail as appropriate but the following seem to be of particular relevance (NB: a direct ‘clickable’ link to this publication is included in Appendix I):

3.6.5  From Key Roles and Responsibilities (2017) p.15/16

Cathedrals - Some dioceses have a formal agreement with cathedrals to provide joint safeguarding arrangements. If there are separate arrangements, the DSA should liaise regularly with the named safeguarding leads in cathedrals and offer advice on safeguarding matters, as required. Some cathedrals have employed a professional safeguarding adviser. In these situations they must work closely with the DSA. All concerns or allegations against church officers must be reported to the DSA.                                                                                                                        

The Cathedral Roles and Responsibilities from Key Roles and Responsibilities (2017) p.15/16   

The Dean - The role of the dean is to provide leadership concerning safeguarding, and to encourage everyone to ‘Promote a Safer Church’. In every cathedral the dean will, in chapter:

  • Have an oversight of the activities that are the responsibility of the chapter, particularly involving children and vulnerable adults;  
  • Inform and work in co-operation with the DSA in the event of allegations, suspicions or disclosures of abuse, and ensure that those who may present a risk to children; young people and vulnerable adults are effectively managed;  
  • Encourage a culture of safety and vigilance;  
  • Provide an annual report to the bishop on safeguarding policy, procedures, practice and review in the cathedral.

(At Christ Church Cathedral it could be considered that these responsibilities more generally equate to the role of Sub Dean)

The Chapter - In every cathedral the Chapter will:  

  • Accept its duty of care is to ‘Promote a Safer Church’ for all in the cathedral community, and ensure there is a safeguarding strategy in place;
  • Create an environment which is welcoming, respectful and safe from abuse, and enables and encourages concerns to be raised and responded to openly, promptly and consistently;
  • Adopt and implement House of Bishops’ safeguarding policy and practice guidance;
  • Provide a structure to manage safeguarding in the cathedral with clear lines of accountability;
  • Appoint a Cathedral Safeguarding Officer (CSO) (and possibly a deputy if required) to work with the Dean, the Chapter and cathedral staff to implement House of Bishops’ policy and guidance. This person should be a paid safeguarding professional.  Make arrangements to ensure appropriate support, supervision and training is provided for these officers. It is advised that this may be best achieved by entering an agreement with the diocese to share resources and offer an integrated safeguarding service; this may also be achieved by cathedrals in close proximity sharing a resource.
  • Nominate someone to attend the Diocesan Safeguarding Advisory Panel (DSAP);
  • Collaborate and liaise where required with the statutory and voluntary agencies;
  • Ensure secure storage of records;
  • Liaise with the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser to ensure all safeguarding responsibilities are met within the life of the cathedral;
  • Ensure that all safeguarding allegations or concerns in relation to a church officer are reported to the DSA in line with House of Bishops’ guidance;
  • Ensure suitable training is provided for church officers in line with the training and development and training framework;
  • Provide appropriate insurance cover for all activities undertaken in the name of the cathedral;
  • Ensure appropriate DBS processes are in place;
  • Provide a complaints and whistleblowing procedure which can be used for those who wish to complain about the handling of safeguarding issues;
  • Complete national safeguarding self-assessments as required;
  • Ensure, in liaison with any affiliated schools, that the Chapter fulfils its statutory responsibilities and a progress review forms part of the annual safeguarding review. It is important that there is a clear agreement in place between a cathedral and the school that clearly defines where the safeguarding responsibilities of each party begins and ends;
  • Review progress annually, including an annual review of the cathedral safeguarding policy, practices and procedures. 

 

3.6.6 Whilst safeguarding is everybody’s business (CoE national Training and development practice guidance 2017, p.5), there are two specifically designated roles within the Cathedral:

  • Cathedral Safeguarding Officer
  • Cathedral Safeguarding Lead (the Cathedral Secretary). In their absence the Canon in Residence will fulfil this role.

The safeguarding responsibilities of these and other office-holders at the Cathedral are summarised in a table in Appendix B including references to the specific documents and practice guidance that each office-holder would be expected to be familiar with and follow. Lines of accountability are also indicated.

4  Promoting a safe environment and preventing harm

‘safely recruiting and supporting those with any responsibility’ and ‘promoting a safer environment and culture’  (from the six policy areas in: Promoting a Safer Church 2017)

Introduction

4.1  The Cathedral Chapter is committed to promoting the wellbeing of worshippers, visitors, volunteers, students and staff through ensuring that, as far as is possible, the Cathedral is a safe place to worship and to visit and work in and around; that activities and events are managed safely with appropriate risk assessments and risk management arrangements; and that, as far as is reasonably possible, the people for whom the Cathedral is responsible for recruiting and authorising in formal roles (staff and volunteers, those who may be contracted to undertake work in the Cathedral) do not constitute a risk to others.

4.2  Safe places and safe events and activities

4.2.1  All staff and volunteers have a general duty to ensure that the Cathedral, the services, events and activities that take place in and around it are safe. Safety in this context includes both the safety of the environment (primarily addressed through the health and safety policies and procedures that are in place e.g: fire and evacuation etc. but also in relation to the prevention or appropriate response to abuse, to safeguarding and promoting the wellbeing of visitors and participants - again recognising that:

effective safeguarding is achieved by putting children at the centre of the system and by every individual and agency playing their full part. Working Together 2018 p.9.

The same could be said for the effective safeguarding of adults.  

4.2.2 General risk assessments

It is expected that risk assessments will be undertaken for both regular and occasional or specific activities and events. The generic Cathedral risk assessment form and process should be completed and held in the Cathedral Office.

4.3 Safe people

4.3.1  Recruitment The Cathedral recognises and shares the expectation of the House of Bishops that the CoE national Safer Recruitment Practice Guidance 2016 will be followed for the appointment of all Church Officers, (a link to this publication is included in Appendix I), acknowledging that:

  • Safer recruitment practice is an essential part of the Church of England’s approach to safeguarding.

4.3.2  The Cathedral is committed to the principles of the national guidance in:

  • Ensuring that recruitment and selection processes are inclusive, fair, consistent and transparent.  
  • Taking all reasonable steps to prevent those who might harm children or adults from taking up, in our Churches, positions of respect, responsibility or authority where they are trusted by others.  
  • Adhering to safer recruitment legislation, guidance and standards, responding positively to changing understandings of good safer recruitment practice.  (adapted from Safer recruitment practice guidance 2016)

4.3.3  The national CoE Safer Recruitment Practice Guidance (2016) covers safer recruitment practices for people working or volunteering with children and adults and addresses two key areas:

  1. The recruitment process
  2. Criminal record checks (DBS).

4.3.4  The document addresses or provides guidance relating to:

  • A Policy Statement on Safer Recruitment
  • The recruitment process
  • Criminal Records Checks
  • Criminal Records Checks outcome
  • The DBS on line update service
  • DBS Portability
  • Referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service
  • Activities that make a person eligible for an enhanced criminal record check
  • Church of England roles where the activity is seen to be eligible for a criminal record check.

A number of helpful model documents or templates are provided e.g:

  • Model Volunteer Job Role
  • Model Volunteer Application form
  • Model Volunteer Reference form
  • Church of England Confidential Declaration Form
  • Model Volunteer interview / discussion
  • Model Volunteer Letter of appointment

4.3.5  In recruiting and appointing staff and volunteers, the Cathedral will also comply with the requirements of national legislation, statutory guidance and best practice set out in the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 and related Disclosure and Barring Service arrangements. Links to these publications are included in Appendix I.
   
4.3.6  The government has published national Disclosure and Barring Service guidance  and practice tools such as a ‘checking tool’ to help find out which DBS check is right for an employee or volunteer, and the Cathedral will further develop its safer recruitment work drawing on the current guidance and best practice principles.

4.3.7  Induction and training

As part of all induction programmes, new staff members and volunteers will be given a copy of Safeguarding at Christ Church Cathedral: Guide for Staff and Volunteers (2019) and required to undertake the CoE national safeguarding course C0 (an online version is available) within four weeks of the commencement of their duties and as part of their as part of their role-specific induction programme.

4.3.8  The Cathedral recognises and shares the expectation of the House of Bishops that the CoE national Training and Development Practice Guidance (2019) (a link to this publication is included in Appendix I) will be followed.

The guidance outlines:

  • the expectations and requirements for safeguarding training and development in the church context, and how this relates to statutory requirements;
  • the elements of church safeguarding training and the requirements for delivery;
  • details of the range of core training modules, including learning aims and objectives, and expectations and requirements to undertake training by role;
  • details of the range of specialist training modules, including learning aims and objectives, and expectations and requirements to undertake training by role;
  • proposals for implementation of the framework.

4.3.9  The national Training and Development Practice Guidance begins with a policy statement (p.6):

All Church bodies will encourage the provision of supervision and training in order to ensure that:

  • consistent training of the highest quality is offered to all Church officers who work with children, young people and vulnerable adults in every Christian community, and at every stage of ministry;
  • all Church officers are trained in aspects of safeguarding relevant to and commensurate with their role;
  • all training courses will be informed by and support the implementation of the House of Bishops policy and practice guidance;
  • all those who work with children, young people and vulnerable adults are inducted into the Church body’s policy and procedures on safeguarding;
  • each Church body conducts an annual training needs analysis that identifies all Church officers (ordained/lay/paid/unpaid) who require training and develops a training plan based on this, and that this training is monitored and refreshed every three years;
  • all Church bodies ensure delivery at a local level of core and specialist training modules, in line with the House of Bishops practice guidance, as rolled out by the National Safeguarding Team, where they have been identified as necessary through the training needs analysis;
  • training programmes as rolled out by the National Safeguarding Team and outlined in the practice guidance are delivered and updated in line with current legislation, guidance and best practice, and
  • the Church body facilitates the provision of an appropriate level of support to all involved with the delivery of safeguarding training.

4.3.10  The national training strategy is modular in nature recognising that:

Safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility. Core safeguarding training modules aim to promote a safer church across church communities from members of our congregations to our senior leaders. Whilst for some completion of safeguarding training is an expectation as we strive to achieve best practice, for others it is a mandatory requirement for the role that they fulfil. (p.5)

4.3.11  Christ Church Cathedral will follow the recommended training requirements in relation to both ‘core’ and ‘specialist’ modules – as set out in the Training and Development Practice Guidance (2019). The full document should be consulted to ensure that all roles and responsibilities and related training requirements are met but the primary expectations are included in the summary table below:

Title/role

Training requirements

Volunteers & volunteer chaperones

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation

 

Education Guides

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation

 

Volunteer and Visitor Coordinator & Cathedral Education Officer

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation
  • Leadership
  • Safer Recruitment

 

Frideswide Voices Administrator

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation

 

Vergers, Cathedral Operations Manager and Events Assistant

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation

 

Organist, Director of Frideswide Voices

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation
  • Leadership
  • Safer Recruitment

Sub Organist, Lay Clerks, Organ Scholars, FV Music Coordinator,

singing teachers, and music theory teachers

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation

 

Cathedral Clergy and LLMs

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation
  • Leadership

 

Cathedral Safeguarding Leads

(Cathedral Secretary)

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation
  • Leadership
  • Safeguarding Training for Senior Leaders
  • Raising awareness of Domestic Violence and Abuse
  • Safer Recruitment

 

Cathedral Safeguarding Officer

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation
  • Safeguarding Training for Senior Leaders
  • Raising awareness of Domestic Violence and Abuse

 

Safeguarding Sub Committee

Membership to include:

  • Cathedral Safeguarding Officer
  • Sub Dean
  • Cathedral Secretary
  • Other Safeguarding Leads if identified as necessary
  • Cathedral staff and volunteer representatives
  • Organist
  • Director of Frideswide Voices
  • Headmaster
  • Junior Censor / College representative
  • Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser
  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation
  • Leadership
  • Safeguarding Training for Senior Leaders
  • Raising awareness of Domestic Violence and Abuse

 

 

Members of Chapter

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation

 

Dean

 

  • Basic Awareness
  • Foundation
  • Leadership
  • Safeguarding Training for Senior Leaders
  • Raising awareness of Domestic Violence and Abuse

 

From Training and Development Practice Guidance (2019) p.15:

  • Basic Awareness: to develop a basic awareness of safeguarding in the context of the Church and Christian pastoral care. Refresher requirements: completing highest previous level training every 3 years.
  • Foundation: to situate safeguarding in the context of the Church and equip participants with knowledge and skills in knowing what, when and how to report concerns. Refresher requirements: completing highest previous level training every 3 years.
  • Leadership: to equip parish officers to embed healthy parish safeguarding practice, and to explore the roles and personal vulnerabilities of parish officers in implementing parish safeguarding procedures and responding to serious situations Refresher requirements: completing highest previous level training every 3 years.
  • Safeguarding Training for Senior Leaders: to equip the bishop and senior team to embed healthy safeguarding practice and explore the roles and vulnerabilities of senior diocesan officers in implementing diocesan safeguarding procedures and responding to serious situations. Refresher requirements: completing highest previous level training every 3 years.
  • Refresher Training: to refresh and deepen personal knowledge and practice of safeguarding and equip participants to understand and implement changes and developments in national/House of Bishops’/Diocesan safeguarding policies and practice guidance.
  • Safer Recruitment: to develop understanding of why safer recruitment is important in the context of developing a culture of safeguarding in the Church, and to explain how to safely recruit staff and volunteers in line with Church of England policy and guidance. Refresher requirements: completing highest previous level training every 3 years.
  • Raising awareness of Domestic Violence and Abuse: Examine issues relating to domestic abuse, especially for vulnerable groups and children in the context of adult abuse, and how the Church can respond well to this. Refresher requirements: completing highest previous level training every 3 years.

* It is noted in the Training and Development Practice Guidance (2019) that the specialist modules are designed to raise awareness of the relevant specific areas of safeguarding rather than to develop expertise. The guidance advises that the following courses are yet to be written; they will be developed and available upon the House of Bishops approval of accompanying policy and practice guidance:

  • Grooming, sexual abuse, responding to survivors;
  • Spiritual abuse and healthy Christian cultures.

4.3.12  The Cathedral Office will be responsible for overseeing plans for organising required training, with detailed plans being the responsibility of those who manage or co-ordinate specific groups of Cathedral staff e.g: Education Officer, Volunteer & Visitor Coordinator Officer.

4.3.13  The Cathedral Office will maintain a record of the evidence of safeguarding training and development opportunities and completion for staff and Cathedral volunteers. Such a record should meet the minimum expectations outlined in the CoE national Training and Development Practice Guidance (2019):

  • induction documentation/guidance;
  • training needs analysis demonstrating the requirements for core and specialist modules have been considered;
  • a copy of training plans/programmes demonstrating role specific safeguarding training;
  • tracking training, gaps and required refreshers for church officers;
  • records of course attendance;
  • recognising that:
  • training will need to be recorded consistently and accurately to ensure that all those requiring training have a training record. These training records will enable refresher training cycles to be identified and will facilitate monitoring and quality assurance of training.

4.3.14  Some of the training national training courses are available on-line and could be accessed individually or as a group (e.g: if there is a new group of volunteers starting together). Refresher training as a group could enable a valuable shared discussion of safeguarding issues, awareness and effective arrangements in the Cathedral.

4.3.15  The Cathedral may choose to encourage staff and volunteers to access the safeguarding training programme of the Diocese or commission training from an appropriate external provider.

4.3.16  The Chapter will enable sufficient resources to be available to support the training plan (including in relation to recording arrangements) and enable all staff and volunteers to meet the training requirements as part of their regular duties and responsibilities.   

4.3.17  Supervision, support and guidance

Safeguarding should be seen as a key aspect of the work (paid or voluntary, formal or informal) of everyone associated with the Cathedral and everyone is expected to play a part in preventing harm; recognising situations or behaviour that may cause likely or actual harm; and responding effectively to concerns that may arise, in line with these procedures.  Discussion about safeguarding matters could also be considered a ‘standing item’ on the agenda for supervision, team or group meetings, staff appraisals and reviews where appropriate.

4.3.18  If individuals are involved in responding to a safeguarding concern it needs to be recognised that this may elicit strong feelings – and colleagues may not be aware of each other’s own personal or professional experiences past or present. Particular support needs to be given to someone who raises or reports a safeguarding concern and is involved in or may be affected by the ongoing management of the matter.  

4.3.19  Those people with managerial/supervisory responsibilities should, especially, seek to promote a culture of awareness (including not being naïve about the possibility of risk or harm occurring), have and promote clear expectations about appropriate sharing of concerns with the Cathedral Safeguarding Leads or Cathedral Safeguarding Officer – including in relation to behaviour of anyone associated with the Cathedral (staff, volunteers or visitors) that may put someone at risk. Staff and volunteers need to be made aware of the policy and process to report concerns of this nature (commonly known as ‘whistleblowing’). The relevant policy is included in Appendix H (the policy has been adapted from that included in the Cathedral School safeguarding procedures); a link and some information to guidance from the Charity Commission: Report serious wrongdoing at a charity as a worker or volunteer (October 2018) is also included in this appendix.

4.3.20  In the event of an allegation about a member of staff or volunteer (both considered in the CoE national practice guidance to be a ‘Church officer’) relating to a safeguarding matter, then support and contact should be managed in discussion and agreement with the local authority designated officer or team overseeing the process. Working Together 2018 (p.59) requires the following:

7. Employers, school governors, trustees and voluntary organisations should ensure that they have clear policies in place setting out the process, including timescales for investigation and what support and advice will be available to individuals against whom allegations have been made. Any allegation against people who work with children should be reported immediately to a senior manager within the organisation or agency. The (local authority) designated officer, or team of officers, should also be informed within one working day of all allegations that come to an employer’s attention or that are made directly to the police.

4.3.21  Code of conduct

The ‘core principles’ comprising one of the five ‘foundations’ for effective safeguarding work in Promoting a Safer Church (2017) (see p.4/5 of this document, above) provide a firm basis for sensitive, respectful and safe practice and include:

  • The welfare of the child, young person and vulnerable adult is paramount
  • Integrity, respect and listening to all
  • Transparency and openness
  • Accountability
  • A commitment to the prevention of abuse
  • The active management of risk
  • Promoting a culture of informed vigilance

4.3.22  The following general good practice points from Appendix 11 of the national practice guidance Safer recruitment practice guidance (2016) – and also included in section 5.6.6 c) below – are helpful:

c. Things to remember:

  1. Treat everyone with respect, setting a positive example for others.
  2. Respect personal space and privacy.
  3. Ensure any actions cannot be misrepresented by someone else.
  4. Challenge unacceptable behaviour.
  5. Do not put anyone, including yourself, in a vulnerable or compromising situation.
  6. Do not have inappropriate physical or verbal contact with others.
  7. You must not keep allegations or suspected abuse secret.

4.3.23  The CoE produces national Guidelines for the Professional Conduct of the Clergy but none of the CoE national safeguarding practice guidance documents include a safeguarding code of conduct.

4.3.24  There is a potentially useful ‘code’ initially developed in 2009 by the DCSF (Department of Children, Schools and Families) and later revised by the Safer Recruitment Consortium in 2015. Whilst its primary focus is to guide safer practice for those who with children and young people (and originally in education settings), many of the topics and points would also appear relevant for work with adults, especially vulnerable adults.  The document addresses topics such as:

  • Power and positions of trust and authority;
  • Standards of behaviour;
  • Gifts, rewards, favouritism and exclusion;
  • Communication including the use of technology;
  • Physical contact;
  • Behaviour management;
  • Transportation;
  • Educational visits;
  • First Aid and medication;
  • Photography, video and other images.

The guide can be found as a link in Appendix F.  All new staff and volunteers should be made aware of this guide and be expected to follow it.

4.3.25  Managing agreements

– ‘responding to those that may pose a risk to others’

Section 7 of the CoE national guidance: Practice Guidance: Responding to, assessing and managing safeguarding concerns or allegations against church officers (2017) recognises (p.70) that:

The Church has a duty to minister to all, which imposes a particular responsibility to ensure that everyone who attends the Church is safe. This includes not only victims/survivors of abuse offences but all individuals who come to church. This means that it will include those people who have convictions. All must be considered equally to ensure everyone is safe, no matter what their background.

Where people have convictions, which give rise to a safeguarding concern, their position in a congregation or community may need to be carefully and sensitively considered/assessed to decide whether they pose a risk to others and to put in place arrangements to ensure that these risks are mitigated. This may include people convicted of violent or sexual offences against children, young people and/or vulnerable adults. It may also include those convicted of offences linked to domestic violence/abuse and people involved in drug or alcohol addiction. In addition, there may be those who do not have convictions or cautions but where there are sound reasons for considering that they still might present a risk to others.

4.3.26  The Cathedral recognises that:

Any person who may present a potential known risk to children, young people or vulnerable adults (e.g. because they are an offender of a sexual/violent offence) and who is seeking to be a member of a Christian congregation or community must have a risk assessment. (p.70 as above)

The processes for risk assessment and management is set out in Practice Guidance: Responding to, assessing and managing safeguarding concerns or allegations against church officers (2017) and the Cathedral will follow these in discussion with the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser and Team where necessary and appropriate.   

5  Responding to concerns

‘responding promptly to every safeguarding concern or allegation’ (from the six policy areas in: Promoting a Safer Church 2017)

  1. The primary national CoE practice guidance relevant for all ‘Church bodies’ (where Church bodies are defined as: ‘…PCCs, diocesan bodies, cathedrals, religious communities, theological educational institutions and the National Church Institutions.’ footnote on p.6) for responding to concerns is: Practice guidance: Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017) (A link to this publication is included in Appendix I) and this guidance also includes guidance in relation to: Risk assessment and management of those that may pose a known risk to children, young people or vulnerable adults within a Christian Congregation or Community.

Page 2: includes a statement of the Church’s commitment:

…to responding promptly to every safeguarding concern or allegation as set out in ‘Promoting a Safer Church’ the Church of England’s Policy Statement for children, young people and adults. This requires that anyone who brings any safeguarding suspicion, concern, knowledge or allegation of current or non-current abuse to the notice of the Church will be responded to respectfully and in a timely manner. The response must also be in line with statutory child and adult safeguarding procedures, criminal and ecclesiastical law and the House of Bishops’ safeguarding policy and practice guidance.

It is recognised that:

Despite all efforts to recruit and /or appoint and /or elect safely there will be occasions when safeguarding concerns or allegations against church officers, who have a role in relation to children, young people and /or vulnerable adults, are raised.  (p.7)

The practice guidance defines Church officers as:

A “church officer” is anyone appointed/elected by or on behalf of the Church to a post or role, whether they are ordained or lay, paid or unpaid. (footnote to p. 6)

5.2      Christ Church Cathedral is committed to following this practice guidance including in all situations where there is a concern or allegation that a church officer (member of staff or volunteer), has:

  • Behaved in a way that has harmed a child, young person and/or vulnerable adult, or may have harmed a child, young person and/or vulnerable adult; 
  • Possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child, young person and/or vulnerable adult; 
  • Behaved towards a child, young person and/or vulnerable adult in a way that indicates they may pose a risk of harm to children, young people and/or vulnerable adults. These behaviours should be considered within the context of the main categories of abuse (see guidance on categories of abuse).

These include concerns relating to:

  • Domestic Abuse; 
  • 'Grooming', i.e. meeting a child or young person under 16 with intent to commit a relevant offence (see s15 Sexual Offences Act 2003); 
  • Other 'grooming' behaviour giving rise to concerns of a broader child/adult protection nature e.g. inappropriate text / e-mail messages or images, gifts, socialising etc.( see s67 Serious Crime Act 2015);
  • Possession of indecent photographs / pseudo-photographs of children or young people. This guidance should always be followed when information about a safeguarding concern or allegation against a church officer, who has a role in relation to children, young people and/or vulnerable adults is received, irrespective of how information comes to light (for instance, through review of files; media contact; information from an alleged victim/survivor; information from a statutory agency; report from a local church) P.7)

5.3  Similarly, the following general guidance is relevant: (p.8/9 of Practice guidance: Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers 2017)

If staff are uncertain about whether the matter is a safeguarding concern or allegation or whether the respondent is a ‘church officer’ who has a role with children, young people and/or vulnerable adults, advice should be sought from the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser (DSA); if they are in doubt, they should take advice from local Children or Adults Services, from the National Safeguarding Team and/or the registrar. Anyone receiving information about or observing a safeguarding concern or allegation, where a child, young person or vulnerable adult is in immediate danger or requires immediate medical attention must call the emergency services on 999. Do not delay.

If at any point during the process, of responding to, assessing or managing a safeguarding concern or allegation, information comes to light which suggests a child, young person and/or vulnerable adult is at risk of harm, the referral to the statutory agencies should not be delayed.

The overarching aim of this practice guidance is to ensure that the Church has in place a fair process for responding to safeguarding concerns or allegations against a church officer who has a role with children, young people and/or vulnerable adults.

When a safeguarding concern or allegation is raised, a system of support and monitoring for those subject to concerns or allegations or who present a risk of harm to children, young people and/or vulnerable adults (referred to from this point as the respondent) is provided.

This guidance provides the process to be followed when information is received about a safeguarding concern or allegation, including:

  • clear roles and responsibilities of safeguarding personnel in relation to responding to safeguarding concerns or allegations;
  • initial response to the concern or allegation;
  • immediate response to ensure safety, including making sure arrangements are in place to inform the respondent, when appropriate, that an allegation has been received about them, and a procedure for deciding whether an Interim Safeguarding Agreement needs to be put in place;
  • immediate reporting and collaboration with statutory agencies;
  • identification of the risk assessment and management process, and the procedures for carrying them out;
  • risk assessment and management of those that may pose a known risk to children, young people and/or vulnerable adults within a Christian congregation or community;
  • management of the safeguarding situation;
  • action required following a statutory investigation; - review of process and learning from the situation.

This guidance recognises that there are additional approaches to be considered when responding to concerns or allegations that relate to someone who is deceased. An addendum to this guidance is being developed to address this specialist situation.

5.4 The Practice guidance: Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017) document provides detailed guidance in relation to:

1. Roles and responsibilities of safeguarding personnel in relation to responding to, assessing and managing safeguarding concerns or allegations

2. Responding to a safeguarding concern or allegation against a Church Officer

  • Immediate reporting and communicating within Church bodies upon receipt of a concern or allegation;
  • Responding to an adult raising a safeguarding concern or allegation;
  • Responding to a child or young person raising a concern or making an allegation;
  • Responding to an anonymous concern/allegation;
  • Responding to someone who admits to abusing a child, young person or vulnerable adult;
  • Safeguarding and the Seal of Confession;
  • Respondent’s working/volunteering for an external;
  • Information sharing.

3. Initial assessment and management of the safeguarding concern or allegation

  • Convening the Core Group;
  • Multi-agency management;
  • Internal Church Investigation;
  • Informing the respondent;
  • Support for the respondent’s family;
  • Initial Case Summary which results in notification to comply with safeguarding policies and procedures and an Interim Safeguarding Agreement;
  • Suspension for the duration of an investigation;
  • Communications.

4. The process to be followed after the statutory agency or an internal investigation has concluded

  • When the initial investigation finds that the concern or allegation is unsubstantiated, unfounded, malicious or false and there are no ongoing safeguarding concerns (return to work);
  • When the initial investigation finds that the concern or allegation is substantiated and/or there are ongoing safeguarding concerns.

5. Risk assessment process

  • What can victims/survivors expect?
  • What can the respondent expect?
  • Which type of risk assessment is required and who should undertake the assessment?
  • Procedure for preparing to carry out an independent risk assessment;
  • Procedure for preparing to carry out a standard risk assessment.
  • What a risk assessment should include (Standard and Independent)?
  • The procedure for sharing the draft independent risk assessment report;
  • The procedure for sharing the draft standard risk assessment report;
  • The procedure to be followed upon receipt of the final independent risk assessment report;
  • The procedure to be followed upon receipt of the final standard risk assessment report;
  • Responsibilities following independent risk assessment;
  • Response to victims or survivors.

6. The ongoing risk management process

  • Monitoring and Ongoing Safeguarding Agreements;
  • Disciplinary processes following an investigation;
  • Referral to the Disclosure and Barring Service.

7. Risk assessment and management of those that may pose a known risk to children, young people or vulnerable adults within a Christian Congregation or Community

  • Assessing and Managing Risk;
  • Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA).

8. Other considerations

  • Record keeping in the context of allegations;
  • Referral to the Charity Commission;
  • Resignations and compromise agreements;
  • What to do if the respondent moves;
  • What to do if the respondent is hospitalised during an ongoing case.

9.   Quality Assurance and Lessons Learnt

5.5  The Practice guidance: Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017) will be followed by Cathedral staff and/or the Diocesan Safeguarding Advisor and team where necessary, required and appropriate.

5.6 What to do if…

5.6.1  The Practice Guidance: Responding to, assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers practice guidance (2017) includes a reporting flowchart (p.24) which:

…refers to any safeguarding concern or allegation against a church officer[1] who has a role with children, young people and/or vulnerable adults, including where the situation relates to a person involved with the Church and the situation is likely to have an impact on or for the Church. It is the responsibility of everyone in the Church to ensure those who may need help and protection are not left at risk.

5.6.2  The flow chart below indicates the process that should be followed when a safeguarding concern or allegation is received relating to a Church Officer and the Cathedral Safeguarding Leads will follow this in accordance with the agreement established with the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser/Team, the Bishop and the chair of the Diocese of Oxford’s Safeguarding Advisory Panel.

 

[1] Again, the guidance defines a Church officer:

A “church officer” is anyone appointed/elected by or on behalf of the Church to a post or role, whether they are ordained or lay, paid or unpaid. Footnote to p. 6 of Practice Guidance: Responding to, assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017)

Safeguarding concern or allegation relating to a Church Officer is received

First action

If there is immediate danger or someone requires immediate medical attention Call Emergency Services 999

Subsequent action

Report to Diocesan Safeguarding Advisor within 24 hours of receiving the concern or allegation

Subsequent action

Convene Initial Group within 24 hours

Does the Safeguarding allegation or concern relate to a Church Officer who is ordained, licensed, authorised, commissioned, or holding permission to officiate?

IF YES

Statutory Authorities within 24 hours - Police, Social Care and LADO where applicable, Or Internal Church Investigation

Relevant Church Roles

National Safeguarding Team

IF NO

Statutory Authorities within 24 hours - Police, Social Care and LADO where applicable, Or Internal Church Investigation

Relevant Church Roles

 

5.6.3  However, it is important to indicate a clear process that will be followed within the Cathedral by all staff and volunteers should a safeguarding concern arise.

This process is complementary and perhaps precedes the considerations and steps that will be followed in the national CoE guidance; both flowcharts should be used.

 

Actual or likely concern in relation to the safety and wellbeing of anyone associated with the Cathedral or regarding the behaviour or attitudes of anyone associated with the Cathedral that could harm others.
Report directly or via supervisor/line manager (e.g: Education Officer,Volunteer & Visitor Coordinator)where appropriate and where this will not cause delay

 

   
 

If concern relates to Safeguarding Lead/s, report concerns to a person you trust to act

 
←                                          →

Urgent
immediate danger or requiring immediate police or medical attention

…and…

Cathedral Safeguarding Lead/s
Cathedral Secretary (or Canon in Residence)

 

Emergency services: 999
Non-emergency police: 101

and/or
Children’s Services
Local Authority Designated Officer
(as required)
Adult Services
Childline
: 0800 11 11
Silverline: 0800 470 80 90 (to seek help for older people)

←   ...if urgency is re-considered..

Liaise with School, College or University Safeguarding Leads as necessary

Refer to Charity Commission as necessary

   
←                           

 ←  ...as necessary or required…

 

 

Cathedral Safeguarding Lead/s

to liaise with

Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser/Team

and the

Cathedral Safeguarding Officer

No further action within safeguarding procedures and processes

 

 

 

For next steps:

see the Diocese of Oxford procedures and the processes set out in CoE national practice guidance, particularly: Responding to, assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers(2017) including contact with CoE National Safeguarding Team if necessary

5.6.4 The following general advice may be helpful for anyone who has a safeguarding concern

  • Remember you may be in just the right place at just the right time to help protect someone or to prevent harm;
  • Always put the welfare of the child, young person or adult first – when deciding what to do;
  • Your role is not to investigate; 
  • Listen carefully, make a clear record of what you are concerned about and what you have seen or heard; date and time this record;
  • Share the information you have with someone who has a safeguarding role and/or who you trust will act;                    
  • If you continue to have concerns: keep raising them; speak to someone else listed in the contact details (see Appendix A and the Safeguarding at Christ Church Cathedral: Guide for Staff and Volunteers).                        

5.6.5  If anyone has concerns relating to the wellbeing or safety of any individual (including themselves) or the conduct or behaviour of a ‘church officer’ member of staff or volunteer, or visitor then they have a duty to share their concerns with one of the Cathedral Safeguarding Leads or Cathedral Safeguarding Officer (it may be appropriate for the person who has the concern to do this via their line manager/supervisor unless to do so might delay a necessary response), or any other person in a position of authority within the Cathedral whom they trust (especially if the concern relates to someone with a particular safeguarding responsibility at the Cathedral).

5.6.6  What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused (2015) also linked from Working Together 2018 includes a number of guiding principles, whilst these refer to children and young people, they may be equally helpful in considering how to respond to concerns about adults. These principles are also included in Appendix C: Essential Knowledge etc.

Guiding principles

  1. No matter where you work, you are likely to encounter children during the course of your normal working activities. You are in a unique position to be able to observe signs of abuse or neglect, or changes in behaviour which may indicate a child may be being abused or neglected.
  2. You should make sure that you are alert to the signs of abuse and neglect, that you question the behaviour of children and parents/carers and don’t necessarily take what you are told at face value. You should make sure you know where to turn to if you need to ask for help, and that you refer to children’s social care or to the police, if you suspect that a child is at risk of harm or is immediate danger.  
  3. You should make sure that you understand and work within the local multi-agency safeguarding arrangements that are in place in your area. In doing so, you should be guided by the following key principles:
    • children have a right to be safe and should be protected from all forms of abuse and neglect;
    • safeguarding children is everyone’s responsibility;
    • it is better to help children as early as possible, before issues escalate and become more damaging; and
    • children and families are best supported and protected when there is a coordinated response from all relevant agencies.
  4. You should not let other considerations, like the fear of damaging relationships with adults, get in the way of protecting children from abuse and neglect. If you think that referral to children’s social care is necessary, you should view it as the beginning of a process of inquiry, not as an accusation. 

5.6.7  Appendix 11 of the national practice guidance Safer recruitment practice guidance (2016) includes these notes taken from the Church of England Model Pocket Sized Guide to Safeguarding (2014)

What to do if:

  1. You have concerns about possible abuse (including allegations):
    1. In an emergency, call emergency services 999.
    2. If you have concerns always consult with children’s or adult care services.
    3. Always inform the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser
    4. Keep a record of what happened, your concerns and your actions.
       
  2. A child, young person or adult wishes to disclose they have been abused:
    1. Listen. Keep listening. Do not question or investigate.
      Do not promise confidentiality;
      tell them we need to share this.
      Assure them they are not to blame.
      Tell them what you are going to do and that they will be told what happens.
    2. Make careful notes of what is said, record dates, times, events and when you are told.
      Report it to the person to whom you are responsible and your priest or safeguarding representative.
    3. Only tell those who need to know.
       
  3. Things to remember:
    1. Treat everyone with respect, setting a positive example for others.
    2. Respect personal space and privacy.
    3. Ensure any actions cannot be misrepresented by someone else.
    4. Challenge unacceptable behaviour.
    5. Do not put anyone, including yourself, in a vulnerable or compromising situation.
    6. Do not have inappropriate physical or verbal contact with others.
    7. You must not keep allegations or suspected abuse secret.

5.6.8 Details of the concerns should be recorded using the agreed recording form. The Cathedral Safeguarding Lead will review the information, discuss with colleagues (including the Cathedral Safeguarding Officer) as appropriate, and report and discuss the information with the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser/Team in accordance with the agreement for joint work between the Cathedral and the Diocesan Safeguarding Team.

5.7  Disclosures including historic concerns

The Practice Guidance Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017) also includes initial guidance in relation to concerns or allegations of past or non-current (historical) abuse - in essence, that these should be responded to in the same way as current ones following the processes set out in the flowcharts above.

In such cases, it is important to find out whether the person against whom the concern or allegation is made is still working with children, young people and/or vulnerable adults and if so, to inform the person's current body for whom they work or other voluntary organisation or refer their family for assessment.  (p.8) 

5.8  Final comments

The statement of commitment from the Practice guidance: Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017) in section 5.1 merits repeating here, confirming that the Church and Christ Church Cathedral are committed to:

…responding promptly to every safeguarding concern or allegation as set out in ‘Promoting a Safer Church’ the Church of England’s Policy Statement for children, young people and adults. This requires that anyone who brings any safeguarding suspicion, concern, knowledge or allegation of current or non-current abuse to the notice of the Church will be responded to respectfully and in a timely manner. The response must also be in line with statutory child and adult safeguarding procedures, criminal and ecclesiastical law and the House of Bishops’ safeguarding policy and practice guidance.

6  Pastoral care and support

‘caring pastorally for victims/survivors of abuse and other affected persons’ – ‘caring pastorally for those who are the subject of concerns or allegations of abuse and other affected persons’ (from the six policy areas in: Promoting a Safer Church 2017)

6.1  Promoting a Safer Church (2017) has two key sections relating to pastoral care and support and the Cathedral is committed to work within the spirit and expectations of the national policy statement when the need for pastoral support relating to safeguarding matters of anyone associated with the Cathedral (worshippers and visitors, students, volunteers and staff) is identified.

The expectations and commitments in Promoting a Safer Church (2017) p.20/21 - are included in full below.      

6.2  Pastoral care for victims/survivors of abuse and other affected persons (p.20)

Caring pastorally for victims/survivors of abuse and other affected persons

The Church will endeavour to offer care and support to all those that have been abused, regardless of the type of abuse, when or where it occurred. The Church is committed to continuing to learn how to respond in a supportive and healing way to the needs of those who have suffered abuse.

Those who have suffered abuse within the Church will receive a compassionate response, be listened to and be taken seriously.  The Church will respond to any disclosure of abuse in accordance with House of Bishops policy and practice guidance. This will be done in collaboration with the relevant statutory agencies in accordance with criminal, civil and ecclesiastical law. They will be offered appropriate pastoral care, counselling and support – according to the agreed need.

All Church Officers will cooperate with the statutory authorities in all cases.

In responding to concerns or allegations of abuse relating to Church Officers, the Church will act in accordance with the requirements of criminal, civil and ecclesiastical law, and so will respect the rights and uphold the safeguards afforded in these, both to the victim/survivor and the subject of concerns or allegations.

An appropriate pastoral response to the family, parish, congregation or order will be considered, with due regard to the right of privacy of those directly involved, and to the administration of justice.

6.3   Pastoral care for those who are the subject of concerns or allegations of abuse and other affected persons (p.21)    

The Church in exercising its responsibilities to suspicions, concerns, knowledge or allegations of abuse will endeavour to respect the rights under criminal, civil and ecclesiastical law of an accused Church Officer including the clergy. A legal presumption of innocence will be maintained during the statutory and Church inquiry processes. As the process progresses additional assessment, therapy and support services may be offered.

The Church will take responsibility for ensuring that steps are taken to protect others when any Church Officer is considered a risk to children, young people and vulnerable adults. This will be done by working to mitigate any identified risks according to a safeguarding agreement.

Church Officers who are the subject of concerns or allegations of abuse belong to families, congregations and church communities. The Church will be mindful of the need to provide support to members of families, parishes and congregations affected by the Church Officers in such situations.

6.4  In the Cathedral, this means that, following discussion and agreement with any relevant parties, appropriate support could be sought from such people as a neighbouring parish priest or the College Chaplain.

6.5  Liturgical resources have been put together and published by the Church of England’s Liturgical Commission and commended by the House of Bishops to support a variety of pastoral circumstances, range from a safeguarding prayer that could be used to conclude a day of safeguarding training, to a litany of penitence for past failures. They will be updated by the Commission as new materials evolve.      

https://www.churchofengland.org/more/media-centre/news/towards-safer-church-liturgical-resources  (Accessed February 2019)

7  Information sharing, management and record keeping  

7.1  Information sharing

7.1.1  The Practice guidance: Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017) includes the following:

2.10 Information sharing The effective protection of children, young people and/or vulnerable adults often depends on the willingness of people to share and exchange relevant information appropriately.

7.1.2  Whilst the national practice guidance should be consulted for greater detail, the following sections would seem to be especially relevant and helpful in guiding good practice.

It is critical there is a clear understanding of the Church’s professional and legal responsibilities regarding data protection, confidentiality and the exchange of information.

2.10.1 What is meant by information sharing? All information regarding safeguarding concerns or allegations (current or non-current) should be shared with the statutory agencies, in the interest of the person. The provision of information to the statutory agencies for the protection of a person, where the safety of others may be at risk will not be a breach of confidentiality or data protection legislation, (even where sharing without consent). The issue of confidentiality should be part of the training given to church officers, so everyone is clear about their legal and moral responsibilities pertaining to the sharing of information, in good faith with statutory agencies. No undertakings regarding confidentiality can ever be given when considering safeguarding matters (apart from the Seal of Confession) (section 2.6) this message is reinforced in all core safeguarding training modules provided by the Church of England. Interagency cooperation is as important in the later stages of safeguarding work as it is at the outset. Therefore, church officers involved in a safeguarding concerns or allegations should consistently make efforts to remain in contact with the statutory agencies, and to communicate all relevant information expediently.

2.10.2 Situations when information must be shared Sharing information with the statutory agencies.  All concerns and allegations regarding safeguarding that evidence that there is a current risk of harm and that meet the requirement for referring (apart from those received under the Seal of the Confession) must be passed to the statutory agencies. Disclosure should include names, addresses, details of the concerns/allegations, and if the respondent has made an admission, where this information is available. Ensure that a record is kept of your decision and your reasons for it.

2.10.3 Situations when information can be shared   As part of an investigation by the statutory agencies Safeguarding information is still subject to data protection legislation. However, information can be shared without consent sensitive personal data (e.g. that which relates to allegations) where it is in the substantial public interest and is necessary for the prevention or detection of any unlawful act and must be carried out without consent because seeking consent would prejudice the purposes.   Information can also be shared without consent if it is in the substantial public interest and the sharing is necessary to support a function designed to protect members of the public from “…dishonesty, malpractice, or other seriously improper conduct by, or the unfitness or incompetence of, any person…” and to seek consent would prejudice those purposes – see The Data Protection (Processing of Sensitive Personal Data) Order 2000.

Where a person does not consent to the sharing of information Individuals may not give their consent to the sharing of information for a number of reasons. For example, they may be frightened; they may fear losing control; they may not trust social services or the police or they may fear that their relationship with the respondent will be damaged. Reassurance and appropriate support along with gentle persuasion may help to change their view on whether it is best to share information.

It is important to:

  • Explore the reasons for a person’s objections;

  • Explain why it is important to share the information;

  • Explain with whom the information will be shared and why;

  • Explain the benefits, to him/her or others, of sharing information (e.g. to prevent a crime/harm);

  • Discuss the consequences of not sharing the information;

  • Reassure him/her that the information will not be shared with anyone who does not need to know;

  • Reassure him/her that they are not alone and that support is available.

It is very important that the risk of sharing information is also considered. In some cases, such as domestic violence and abuse, it is possible that sharing information could increase the risk to the individual.

7.1.3  The statutory guidance document Working Together 2018 also has useful guidance relating to the sharing and management of information in safeguarding matters and includes (p.10) a Myth-busting guide to information sharing which includes the following:

Sharing information enables practitioners and agencies to identify and provide appropriate services that safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

Below are common myths that may hinder effective information sharing.

Data protection legislation is a barrier to sharing information

No – the Data Protection Act 2018 and GDPR do not prohibit the collection and sharing of personal information, but rather provide a framework to ensure that personal information is shared appropriately. In particular, the Data Protection Act 2018 balances the rights of the information subject (the individual whom the information is about) and the possible need to share information about them.

Consent is always needed to share personal information

No – you do not necessarily need consent to share personal information. Wherever possible, you should seek consent and be open and honest with the individual from the outset as to why, what, how and with whom, their information will be shared. You should seek consent where an individual may not expect their information to be passed on. When you gain consent to share information, it must be explicit, and freely given. There may be some circumstances where it is not appropriate to seek consent, because the individual cannot give consent, or it is not reasonable to obtain consent, or because to gain consent would put a child’s or young person’s safety at risk.

Personal information collected by one organisation/agency cannot be disclosed to another

No – this is not the case, unless the information is to be used for a purpose incompatible with the purpose for which it was originally collected. In the case of children in need, or children at risk of significant harm, it is difficult to foresee circumstances where information law would be a barrier to sharing personal information with other practitioners.

The common law duty of confidence and the Human Rights Act 1998 prevent the sharing of personal information 

No – this is not the case.

In addition to the Data Protection Act 2018 and GDPR, practitioners need to balance the common law duty of confidence and the Human Rights Act 1998 against the effect on individuals or others of not sharing the information.

7.2 Recording 

7.2.1  The Cathedral recognises that standardised and formal recording of concerns, discussions and actions is necessary for effective, transparent and accountable safeguarding practice.

7.2.2  Where appropriate and when necessary, the Cathedral will use the recording guidelines and templates provided by the National Safeguarding Team in Practice Guidance Responding to, assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers 2017 e.g.:

7.2.3  This guidance has 8 Appendices

  • Appendix 1 – Template notification to follow safeguarding policy and procedures
  • Appendix 2 – Template Initial Case Summary
  • Appendix 3 – Template Interim Safeguarding Agreement
  • Appendix 4 – Template Case Management Update Tool
  • Appendix 5 – Template Ongoing Safeguarding Agreement
  • Appendix 6 - Template Referral and terms of reference for an independent risk assessment
  • Appendix 7 – Template Letter of instruction for independent risk assessment
  • Appendix 8 - Model ongoing safeguarding agreement with an offender.

From Practice Guidance: Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017)

7.2.4  Appendices 2 and 4 are perhaps of most specific relevance and are reproduced in the appended material to this document – in Appendix D

7.2.5  All ‘paper’ and digital records are to be kept securely in the Cathedral Office with access permissions and arrangements agreed and explained to relevant parties. Again, in relation to information, sharing, recording and information management, the Cathedral will follow the expectations and requirements in the CoE national document:Practice Guidance: Responding to, assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017).

8   Linking to other bodies and related policies and procedures

‘Collaboration with key statutory authorities and other partners’ (from the ‘Core Principles’ in Promoting a Safer Church 2017)

8.1 Introduction

8.1.1  Christ Church Cathedral holds a specific position as a ‘peculiar’ which, as noted in Key Roles and Responsibilities of Church Office Holders and Bodies Practice Guidance (Dec 2017), ‘peculiars’:

Sit(s) outside diocesan and provincial structures and are not subject to visitation by the bishop or archbishop. This gives them considerable independence.  

  Nevertheless, it is advised that:

…in relation to safeguarding, peculiars adopt the House of Bishops’ safeguarding policy and practice guidance and the roles and responsibilities that relate to other similar sized Church bodies e.g. a cathedral or a parish.

8.1.2  The Cathedral is also one element of the charity: The Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford of the Foundation of King Henry VIII the others being Christ Church College and Christ Church Cathedral School.

8.1.3  The Cathedral is the College Chapel for the College as well as the cathedral church for the Diocese of Oxford. 

8.1.4  Whilst the need for respective independence of these bodies is recognised, so too is the nature of their inter-relationship and level of co-dependency, perhaps exemplified in some shared roles e,g: the Chair and Vice-Chair of the Governing Body of the Cathedral School are the Dean and Sub Dean of the Cathedral, respectively, the Sub Dean is also the school governor responsible for safeguarding; the Dean is also the head of the Governing Body of Christ Church, a constituent college of the University of Oxford; the positions of College and Cathedral Chaplain are held in common as is the position of Cathedral Succentor, Assistant College Chaplain, and School Chaplain.

8.1.3  The safeguarding arrangements described in this document pertain to the Cathedral but the links to the other constituent elements of the charitable institution The Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford of the Foundation of King Henry VIII are considered below. Whilst specific arrangements have developed in the constituent parts of the institution, in general the legal and statutory requirements and related duties, responsibilities and organisational and practice expectations set out in sections 3.2 and 3.3 above, and the requirements of the Charity Commission (section 3.4) provide the common foundation for safeguarding arrangements.  

8.2 Links to the Cathedral School in relation to safeguarding arrangements

8.2.1  The Cathedral School has a Safeguarding (Child Protection) Incorporating Staff Behaviour and Code of Conduct, Whistleblowing Policy, Physical Restraint & Use of Reasonable Force Policy and Searching & Confiscation Policy

8.2.2  On the School website, under the heading Cathedral Safeguarding Policy, an additional document is available that specifically addresses Additional Safeguarding Children Procedures Pertaining to the Music Department 2010 revised 2020 

This document addresses the point at which the school and Cathedral safeguarding arrangements meet, especially in respect of the Christ Church Cathedral Choir choristers and those who work and sing with them and who have responsibility for their welfare. The document covers:

1. General Introduction

2. Procedures to be followed by all members of the Music Department

3. The care and supervision of choristers in the Cathedral

3.1 The Weekly Timetable

3.2 Supervision in the Cathedral

3.3 Illness in the Cathedral

3.4 Vocal Health

3.5 Practical arrangements

3.6 Special services & additional commitments

3.7 External engagements

3.8 Tours

This is included as Appendix G and should be reviewed and revised where necessary as part of the annual review and work of the proposed Christ Church Cathedral Safeguarding Sub Committee.

8.2.3  As part of the Cathedral safeguarding governance and quality assurance arrangements (see section 9, below), it is proposed that the Head of the Cathedral School is a member of the Safeguarding Sub Committee of the Chapter.

8.3 Links with the Church College and the University

8.3.1  Christ Church College as a constituent college of the University of Oxford, has a Child Protection Policy subtitled: Christ Church Code of Practice on Protection of Children and Vulnerable Adults

The primary objective of the policy is:

  • to provide a safe environment for children and vulnerable adults within college premises and in activities undertaken with the approval of the college.

8.3.2  The policy notes that:

The College will take all reasonable steps to ensure that its premises are safe for children and vulnerable adults whose presence can be reasonably anticipated

identifying that it has a general duty of care:

Duty of Care

The College will discharge its duty of care to ensure that it will not permit any activity which puts any child or vulnerable adult at risk of abuse, understanding that abuse can be physical, sexual, emotional, or neglect. In the furtherance of this duty it will take proper care that

(a) persons who undertake any welfare role with regard to students or members of staff on behalf of the college have been demonstrated to have appropriate qualities to perform such a role;

(b) members of staff who come into contact with children or vulnerable adults do not do so in circumstances in which there is risk of abuse;

(c) any allegations or evidence of harm to a child or vulnerable adult will be taken seriously and investigated

8.3.3  The College has a designated Responsible College Officer:

The College Officer who oversees college policies for the protection of children and vulnerable adults is the Junior Censor (junior.censor@chch.ox.ac.uk), in consultation with the College Welfare Lead and Chaplain, and the College Access and Outreach Officer is trained in safeguarding procedures.   

8.3.4  As part of the new Cathedral safeguarding governance and quality assurance arrangements (see section 9, below), it is proposed that the Junior Censor of the College is a member of the Safeguarding Sub Committee of the Chapter.

8.3.5  The University has a Safeguarding homepage and a Safeguarding Code of Practice

Moreover, it has two Safeguarding Officers, whose role are described on the University website.

8.3.6  The University Safeguarding Code of Practice includes guidance on:

1. Aim

2. Planning an activity

3. Training

4. Dealing with suspicions or allegations of abuse

5. Useful links

Definitions used in this Code of Practice

These links may be followed to access the guidance. Section 4 (above) should be consulted whenever there is a safeguarding concern that includes a university dimension.

8.3.7  Should a safeguarding concern arise that may have implications for the College and/or the University, or may be the proper responsibility of the College or University, then the Cathedral Safeguarding Lead/s should liaise with those with safeguarding responsibilities as appropriate: the Junior Censor for the College, and the University Safeguarding Officers. This process is indicated on the flowchart in section 5.6.3.

8.3.8  Just as a safeguarding matter may overlap with health and safety considerations (see section 4.2.1, above), there may also be an overlap with other relevant policies, procedures and processes of the College or University, such as those relating to harassment, bullying, lone-working – and related grievance and disciplinary measures (see Appendix I for links to university policies of relevance for safeguarding, for example). This may lead to one process taking precedence over another, processes running together or the need to delay one process until the completion of another. These considerations should be part of a discussion about the most appropriate response to a safeguarding concern.

Other processes or procedures should not take precedence to the point where safeguarding matters are not addressed or responding to them is unduly delayed or is inadequate – increasing the risk of, or actually harming any individual involved.

8.4 Links to the Diocese of Oxford

8.4.1 As noted in paragraph 3.6.5 (above) from Key Roles and Responsibilities of Church Office Holders and Bodies Practice Guidance (2017) p.15/16

Cathedrals - Some dioceses have a formal agreement with cathedrals to provide joint safeguarding arrangements. If there are separate arrangements, the DSA should liaise regularly with the named safeguarding leads in cathedrals and offer advice on safeguarding matters, as required. Some cathedrals have employed a professional safeguarding adviser. In these situations they must work closely with the DSA. All concerns or allegations against church officers must be reported to the DSA.

The practice guidance suggests that even where there is no formal agreement to provide joint safeguarding arrangements, the DSA:

DSA should liaise regularly with the named safeguarding leads in cathedrals and offer advice on safeguarding matters, as required (p.15)

It is recognised that a DSA’s role is in relation to:

  • Issuing guidance on safeguarding matters for church officers in the diocese and parish safeguarding officers in any parish in the diocese that is consistent with the guidance issued by the House of Bishops; (p.15)                               

8.4.2  It is agreed that the Cathedral will establish an arrangement and agreement with the Bishop of Oxford and the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser and Team: for consultation, advice and co-management in the event of a safeguarding matter arising, using the processes, procedures and arrangements (e.g: establishing a Core Group where necessary to respond effectively and manage a safeguarding concern) set out in the national CoE document: Practice Guidance: Responding to, assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017). This arrangement is reflected on the flowchart in section 5.6.3 above.

8.4.3  The roles and responsibilities of Diocesan Safeguarding Advisers are set out in

8.4.4  The arrangement may also comprise access to the Diocesan training programme or the provision of training for Cathedral staff subject to resource considerations.

8.4.5  As part of the new Cathedral safeguarding governance and quality assurance arrangements (see section 9, below), it is proposed that the Cathedral is represented on the Diocese of Oxford Safeguarding Advisory Panel by one of the Cathedral Safeguarding Leads or the Cathedral Safeguarding Officer. The roles and responsibilities of the Diocesan Safeguarding Advisory Panel are set out in section 2.4 of Key Roles and Responsibilities of Church Office Holders and Bodies Practice Guidance (2017).

8.4.6  The Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser or a representative from the Diocesan Safeguarding Team will also be a member of the Safeguarding Sub Committee of the Chapter (see section 9.3)

8.5  Links to the CoE national structures and safeguarding arrangements

8.5.1  Section 1 of Key Roles and Responsibilities of Church Office Holders and Bodies Practice Guidance (2017) outlines the national structures and arrangements and associated roles and responsibilities including for:

  • Archbishops (1.1)
  • The House of Bishops (1.2)
  • National Safeguarding Lead Bishop (1.3)
  • The Archbishop’s Council (1.4)
  • The Church Commissioners (1.5)
  • General Synod (1.6)
  • National Safeguarding Steering Committee (1.7)
  • The National Safeguarding Team (1.8)
  • The National Safeguarding Panel (1.9)

In particular, the National Safeguarding Team’s role in providing

expert advice, guidance and support to dioceses, cathedrals, National Church Institutions and other Church bodies in respect of safeguarding policy, training, casework and communications; 

In some circumstances it may be necessary to involve the National Safeguarding Team should difficulties arise in relation to safeguarding arrangements or the management of a safeguarding concern, recognising that Diocesan Safeguarding Advisers’ responsibilities include:

Where the advisor thinks that safeguarding matters are not being dealt with properly and it has not proved possible to resolve within the diocese the points at issue, informing the National Safeguarding Team. (Key Roles and Responsibilities of Church Office Holders and Bodies Practice Guidance (2017) p.15) 

8.6    Links to the Local Safeguarding Boards (Children and Adults) or successor bodies

8.6.1  Christ Church Cathedral is committed to follow the statutory guidance on safeguarding children and young people (most notably Working Together 2018) and adults (most notably the Care and Support Guidance 2018) and the requirements and expectations are set out in section 3, above.

8.6.2  The local safeguarding boards (and successor body in relation to children and young people – where the ‘three local safeguarding partners’ (the local authority, the police and local health clinical commissioning groups, see Working Together 2018) have procedures and guidance including, most importantly a ‘threshold document’.

16. The safeguarding partners should publish a threshold document, which sets out the local criteria for action in a way that is transparent, accessible and easily understood.                                                   

Working Together 2018 p. 16

8.6.3  The local safeguarding arrangements must be followed and, whilst, it is expected that CoE practice guidance is compliant with the legislation and statutory guidance, it is suggested that the latter would take precedence in most cases.  The ‘flowchart’ in section 5.6 3, above, shows links to the Children’s Services, the local authority designated officer (LADO - or team) in the case of any allegations against staff or volunteers, and adult services.

8.6.4  The local safeguarding expectations about referral at the point of a safeguarding concern arising must be followed and Cathedral or national CoE guidance or custom and practice cannot take precedence over compliance with legislation, statutory guidance or local procedures based upon them.

8.6.5  The links to the local safeguarding children and safeguarding adults boards and related procedures are included in the references and resources appendix (I) and the contact details are included in Appendix A. 

9   Governance: Continuing to develop safeguarding practice and arrangements

‘As a Church we continue to commit to a journey of truth, healing, learning and abuse prevention’ (from Promoting a Safer Church 2017)

9.1 Introduction

The full section from Promoting a Safer Church (2017) from which the sentence above is taken reads:

The statutory reports and independent reviews into abuse that have involved the Church of England and other faith organisations highlight past errors and significant lessons to be learnt to improve safeguarding. As a Church we continue to commit to a journey of truth, healing, learning and abuse prevention. (p.16)

9.2  The Dean and Canons of Christ Church Cathedral retain the primary responsibility for the governance of safeguarding arrangements and are committed to continuing to develop safeguarding arrangements and practice through:

  • Promoting awareness and compliance with this document (Christ Church Cathedral Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements 2019) and the related guides:
    • Safeguarding at Christ Church Cathedral: Guide for Staff and Volunteers
    • Safeguarding at Christ Church: Guide for Visitors
    • Safeguarding at Christ Church: Quick reference Guide
  • Meeting the expectations for induction and training relating to respective roles and responsibilities in the CoE national: Training and Development Practice Guidance (2019)
  • Developing a preventative approach through promoting safe places and activities, safe people and a capacity to recognise and respond effectively to safeguarding concerns at all levels
  • Having a Cathedral Safeguarding Officer and Cathedral Safeguarding Leads (and with the Canon in Residence deputising where necessary) to ensure a daily primary contact and capacity to respond without delay - with clear terms of reference for their role (see Appendix B)  
  • Developing and maintaining formal and informal effective working partnerships with others who hold safeguarding responsibilities in the Cathedral School, the College, the University, the Diocese (including developing an agreement with the Bishop and the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser/Team and Safeguarding Advisory Panel in relation to operational arrangements - consultation, advice and the co-management of responding to safeguarding matters that may arise) and the local Safeguarding Children and Safeguarding Adults Boards (or their successor bodies – see Working Together 2018 and local arrangements)
  • Membership of the Diocesan Safeguarding Advisory Panel
  • Establishing a Cathedral Chapter Safeguarding Sub Committee (see below)
  • Reviewing annually incidents and learning – from within the Cathedral, locally and nationally
  • Reviewing annually the Cathedral’s safeguarding arrangements (including these procedures and related documents (perhaps using the guidance regarding the content of procedures in the Care and Support statutory guidance 2018 – see section 3.3.5 above) and revising as required
  • Presenting an annual safeguarding report to the Cathedral Chapter
  • Participating in audits and reviews undertaken for the CoE National Safeguarding Panel and Team and using audit tools to ensure that best practice is in place e.g: Safeguarding Standards and Guidance for the Voluntary and Community Sector (2017 ed). NSPCC
  • Providing sufficient resources to support the Cathedral to fulfil its requirements under legislation and statutory guidance; the requirements and expectations of the House of Bishops, the National Safeguarding Panel and Team; and the Charity Commission.

9.3  Cathedral Chapter Safeguarding Sub Committee

9.3.1  The Cathedral Chapter Safeguarding Sub Committee will comprise:

  • Cathedral Safeguarding Officer
  • Cathedral Safeguarding Lead
  • Cathedral staff and volunteer representatives
  • Organist and Cathedral Choir Choirmaster
  • Director of Frideswide Voices
  • Head of the Cathedral School
  • Junior Censor / College representative
  • Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser

9.3.2  The role and responsibilities of the Sub Committee are indicated in Appendix B: Safeguarding at CCC: summary of key roles and responsibilities, training requirements and lines of accountability; terms of reference; accountability; agreement with the Diocese of Oxford but essentially this sub committee should provide the strategic oversight for safeguarding matters at the Cathedral, meeting once a year as a minimum to:

  • Review incidents and learning – from within the Cathedral, and locally and nationally;
  • Review the Cathedral’s safeguarding arrangements (including these procedures and related documents) and revising as required to ensure that they are compliant with national statutory requirements, the CoE national expectations and requirements, the Charity Commission;
  • Review the ‘Promoting a Safer Church’ action plan (see 9.2.4 below) and set priorities for the coming year,
  • Prepare an annual safeguarding report to be presented to the Cathedral Chapter, including any proposals for changes in the safeguarding arrangements (policy, procedure and practice) of the Cathedral.

9.3.3  The Safeguarding Sub Committee or appropriate representatives may meet more frequently as considered necessary to discuss, advise, guide and assist the operational management of practice in relation to specific safeguarding issues or incidents that may arise.

9.3.4  Promoting a Safer Church (2017) concludes with the expectation that:

All Church bodies should ensure that:  

  • All Church Officers have access to this (Promoting a Safer Church) Policy Statement;
  • The Policy Statement is promoted and publicised;
  • The Church’s safeguarding message is communicated as reflected in the policy;
  • They have a ‘Promoting a Safer Church’ action plan in place that sets out, in line with national and local priorities, how the policy is being put into action and is reviewed regularly.

As part of this revision of the Christ Church Cathedral Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements a ‘Promoting a Safer Church’ action plan will be produced that will inform the developments in practice over the coming year and will then be reviewed at least annually by the Cathedral Chapter Safeguarding Sub Committee.   

10   Conclusion

Being faithful to our call to share the gospel therefore compels us to take with the utmost seriousness the challenge of preventing abuse from happening and responding well wherever it has.’ (from the five ‘foundations’:  Promoting a Safer Church 2017)

On behalf of my colleagues on the Chapter, may I thank you for taking the time to familiarise yourself with our Safeguarding Policy and its associated Procedures and Arrangements. I wish you every blessing in all that you do with us to serve God and God’s people in this wonderful place.

The Revd Canon Richard Peers, Sub Dean

 

Appendices

A) Key contact numbers

B) Safeguarding at CCC: summary of key roles and responsibilities; training requirements; lines of accountability; agreement with the Diocese of Oxford

C) Essential knowledge: definitions, signs and symptoms, ‘contextual’ safeguarding

D) Templates for reporting and recording

E) Charity Commission document

F) Codes of Conduct

G) Christ Church Cathedral School - Additional Safeguarding Children procedures pertaining to the Music Department 2010 revised 2020

H) Frideswide Voices - Additional Safeguarding Children procedures pertaining to the Music Department

I) Reporting concerns about Cathedral ‘officers’ (staff or volunteers), commonly referred to as a ‘whistleblowing’ policy

J) Record of Concern Form

K) References and resources

 

Appendix A) Key contact numbers

a) Christ Church Cathedral


b) Christ Church


c) Oxford University

The University of Oxford Safeguarding Code of Practice (accessed Dec. 2018)

University of Oxford policy statements and codes of practice

A list of the University’s key policies can be found at: http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/lso/statutes/

The following are of particular relevance:

University Harassment Policy and Procedures

University Equality policy

University Data Protection Policy

University Public Interest Disclosure (‘whistleblowing’) policy

Safety Office: Health and Safety of young people and children

Policy on the ethical conduct of research involving human participants and personal data

Staff-student relationships

IT guidelines on handling illegal material  

Personnel guidance relating to recruitment and pre-employment screening


d) Relevant Local Authority/Safeguarding Partners

Oxford Safeguarding Children Board website (accessed Dec. 2018) https://www.oscb.org.uk/reporting-concerns/

Reporting Concerns

To report a new concern

Immediate Concerns about a Child

The Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) is the front door to Children’s Social Care for all child protection and immediate safeguarding concerns. If there is an immediate safeguarding concern, for example:

* Allegations/concerns that the child has been sexually/physically abused;

* Concerns that the child is suffering from severe neglect or other severe health risks;

* Concern that a child is living in or will be returned to a situation that may place him/her at immediate risk;

* The child is frightened to return home;

* The child has been abandoned or parent is absent.

You should call the MASH immediately Tel: 0345 050 7666 (This number will take you through to Customer Services who will ask a series of questions and triage into MASH where safeguarding concerns are raised).

A No Names Consultation should not be used for the above scenarios.

The Oxfordshire MASH Referral Form (MASH Enquiry online referral form) may be used by professionals only to refer children to social services.

Or you can email a report to MASH on the secure email on:

mash-childrens@oxfordshire.gcsx.gov.uk

Please see the OSCB Conflict Resolution Policy and Whistleblowing Policy for guidance on managing disagreements and raising concerns at work.

To talk about an on-going concern

If you want to speak to someone about an already open case contact the relevant Children’s Social Care Team.

  • Oxford City – 01865 328563
  • North Oxfordshire (including Banbury, Witney and Bicester): 01865 323039
  • South Oxfordshire (including Abingdon, Faringdon, Wantage, Thame, Didcot and Henley): 01865 323041
  • Emergency Duty Team: 0800 833 408
  • John Radcliffe Hospital Assessment Team: 01865 221236 (for antenatal safeguarding concerns and issues concerning children in the hospital).

If you are unsure whether to make a referral

You can contact the Locality and Community Support Service (LCSS) and request a ‘no names’ consultation (meaning you don’t give the child’s name). You can then discuss the situation with them and they will advise you on what to do next. If a referral needs to be made they will advise you of this.

  • LCSS Central:  0345 241 2705
  • LCSS North (including Banbury, Witney, Bicester, Carterton and Woodstock): 0345 241 2703
  • LCSS South (including Abingdon, Faringdon, Wantage, Thame, Didcot and Henley): 0345 241 2608

To report concerns about child sexual exploitation

If a child or young person has made a disclosure regarding sexual exploitation, or if you think a child may be at risk of being sexually exploited please contact the Kingfisher Team on: 01865 309196.  Out of hours calls to this number will be diverted to the Thames Valley Police Referral Centre.

To report concerns about child radicalisation

If you are concerned about a child or young person being radicalised please follow the guidance in this document below:

Making a Prevent Referral (see https://www.oscb.org.uk/reporting-concerns/ for the document and further guidance)

To report concerns about a professional or person in a position of trust

Please contact the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) to report an allegation or concern on: 01865 810603 or email: LADO.safeguardingchildren@oxfordshire.gov.uk

From the Oxfordshire Safeguarding Adults Board website


e) Oxford Diocese

For general safeguarding enquiries and advice on policies or procedures:
safeguarding@oxford.anglican.org

Diocesan Safeguarding Team:

For urgent and confidential safeguarding matters:

Richard Woodley, Diocesan Safeguarding Advisor – richard.woodley@oxford.anglican.org or 07391 868478

Emma Hooper, Safeguarding Casework Officer, emma.hooper@oxford.anglican.org or 07435 550685

Erica Hegg, Safeguarding Casework Officer,  erica.hegg@oxford.anglican.org or 07341 866832

For queries on safeguarding training:

Rebecca Norris-Bulpitt, Safeguarding Assistant & Training Officer – rebecca.norris-bulpitt@oxford.anglican.org or 01865 587041

For DBS and general safeguarding enquiries:

Linda Carpenter, Safeguarding Administrator – linda.carpenter@oxford.anglican.org or 01865 208267


f) National CoE Safeguarding Team

If you wish to report any safeguarding concerns directly to the NST please email safeguarding@churchofengland.org.


g) Charity Commission

The Charity Commission:

  • Help and advice for potential whistleblowers: the charity Protect (formerly Public Concern at Work) provides free confidential advice to employees who have concerns about wrongdoing in the workplace. Contact the charity on 020 7404 6609.   https://www.pcaw.org.uk/

h) Others

Childline: 0800 11 11

Silverline: 0800 470 80 90 (to seek help for older people)

Kingfisher Team: kingerfisherteam@oxfordshire.gov.uk  01865 309196


Appendix B) Safeguarding at CCC: summary of key roles and responsibilities, training requirements and lines of accountability; terms of reference; accountability; agreement with the Diocese of Oxford

Title/role

Safeguarding responsibilities

Key relevant minimum documentation and practice guidance

Accountable to, reporting arrangements

Volunteers & volunteer chaperones

 

 

 

Prevention: awareness of potential risks and hazards in environment and activities (places and people)

 

Respond to any concerns following the process set out in the flowchart in section 5.6.3 and in the Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors

 

Continue to raise concerns if it is considered that the concern remains and has not been responded to adequately

 

Be familiar with documentation (see next column)

(see next column)

 

Undertake required training

  

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Volunteers

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors

 

Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (2015) 

Cathedral Safeguarding Leads

 

Volunteer & Visitor Coordinator

 

Director of Frideswide Voices

 

Education Guides

 

 

 

Prevention: awareness of potential risks and hazards in environment and activities (places and people)

 

Respond to any concerns following the process set out in the flowchart in section 5.6.3 and in the Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors

 

Continue to raise concerns if it is considered that the concern remains and has not been responded to adequately

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Volunteers

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors

 

Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (2015) 

 

 

Cathedral Safeguarding Leads

 

Cathedral Education Officer

 

 

Volunteer & Visitor Coordinator,

Frideswide Voices Administrator

Cathedral Education Officer

 

 

 

 

Prevention: awareness of potential risks and hazards in environment and activities (places and people)

Respond to any concerns following the process set out in the flowchart in section 5.6.3 and in the Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Staff and Visitors

 

Continue to raise concerns if it is considered that the concern remains and has not been responded to adequately

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

Ensure that volunteers understand their safeguarding responsibilities and will act as required – through induction and updates

 

CCC Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Volunteers

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors

 

Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (2015) 

 

Safer recruitment practice guidance (2016)

 

Cathedral Safeguarding Leads

 

Director of Frideswide Voices

Vergers,

Cathedral Operations Manager

and Cathedral Assistant

 

 

 

Prevention: awareness of potential risks and hazards in environment and activities (places and people)

 

Respond to any concerns following the process set out in the flowchart in section 5.6.3 and in the Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Staff and Visitors

 

Continue to raise concerns if it is considered that the concern remains and has not been responded to adequately

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

CCC Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Volunteers

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors

 

Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (2015)   

 

 

Cathedral Safeguarding Leads

Organist,

Sub Organist,

Director of Frideswide Voices,

Lay Clerks,

Organ Scholars,

FV Music Coordinator,

music theory teachers,

and singing teachers.

 

 

 

Prevention: awareness of potential risks and hazards in environment and activities (places and people)

 

Respond to any concerns following the process set out in the flowchart in section 5.6.3 and in the Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Staff and Visitors

 

Continue to raise concerns if it is considered that the concern remains and has not been responded to adequately

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

CCC Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements

 

Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (2015) 

 

 

Cathedral Safeguarding Leads

 

Cathedral School Safeguarding Leads

Cathedral Clergy

 

 

Prevention: awareness of potential risks and hazards in environment and activities (places and people)

 

Respond to any concerns following the process set out in the flowchart in section 5.6.3 and in the Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Volunteers

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors

 

CCC Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements

 

Guidelines for the Professional Conduct of the Clergy (2015)

 

Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (2015)   

 

The Chapter

 

The Sub Dean

 

The Dean

Cathedral Safeguarding Leads:

Cathedral Secretary

Canon in Residence (where appropriate)

 

 

 

Operational and strategic leads

 

Primary point of contact regarding any concerns

 

Respond to any concerns following the process set out in the flowchart in section 5.6.3 and in the Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors and in statutory guidance (see documents)

 

Liaise with Diocesan Designated Safeguarding Adviser/Team and other relevant bodies e.g:

  • Statutory services i.e: police, local authority, safeguarding boards
  • Charity Commission

 

Maintain safeguarding records (concerns, action etc.)

 

Oversee training strategy and records

 

Member of Diocesan Safeguarding Advisory Panel

 

Member of Chapter Safeguarding Sub-committee

 

Produce the CCC Annual Safeguarding Report for Chapter

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

CCC Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Volunteers

 

Safeguarding at CCC: Guide for Visitors

 

Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (2015)   

 

Working Together 2018

 

Care and Support Statutory Guidance

 2018 (section 14) 

 

CoE:

Glossary reference document (2017)

Key roles and responsibilities of church office holders and bodies practice guidance (2017)

Practice Guidance: Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017)

Training and development practice guidance (2017)

Safer recruitment practice guidance (2016)

 

Guidelines for the Professional Conduct of the Clergy (2015)

 

Charity Commission:

Essential Trustee: 6 main duties 

10 actions trustee boards need to take to ensure good safeguarding governance (2018)

The essential trustee: what you need to know, what you need to do (May 2018) 

Regulatory and Risk Framework Feb 2018)

Strategy for dealing with safeguarding issues in charities (Dec 2017)

Tackling abuse and mismanagement in your charity (Sept 2017)

How to report a serious incident in your charity (Sept. 2017) and Table of examples Deciding what to report

 Safeguarding - the role of other agencies (2017)                     

 

Safeguarding Standards and Guidance for the Voluntary and Community Sector (2017 ed). NSPCC   

 

 

The Chapter

 

The Dean

Cathedral Safeguarding Officer

 

 

Strategic oversight

 

Chair/Member of Chapter Safeguarding Sub-committee

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

As for Cathedral Safeguarding Leads, above

The Dean

 

The Chapter

 

Governing Body

Safeguarding Sub Committee:

 

Cathedral Safeguarding Officer

• Sub Dean

• Cathedral Secretary

• Other Safeguarding Leads if identified as necessary

• Cathedral staff and volunteer representatives

• Organist

• Director of Frideswide Voices

• Headmaster

• Junior Censor / College representative

Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser

To meet at least annually to review safeguarding activity and arrangements of the Cathedral.

 

To oversee and advise on the management of specific ‘cases’ and situations, meeting in full or as an appropriately agreed group of members as required.

 

To prepare an annual safeguarding report for the Chapter reviewing safeguarding activity and the safeguarding arrangements of the Cathedral; making recommendations about changes in policy, procedures and practice as required.

 

To receive and review complaints about safeguarding practice and processes that may arise.

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

As for Cathedral Safeguarding Leads and Cathedral Safeguarding Officer, above

Chapter

 

 

Members of Chapter

 

 

 

To receive the annual report (CCC Annual Safeguarding Report) of the Safeguarding Advisory Panel regarding safeguarding activity and arrangements

 

To amend/approve changes in policy and procedures and practice as required.

 

To make available such resources as are required to enable effective safeguarding activity in the Cathedral    

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

CCC Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements

 

Charity Commission:

Essential Trustee: 6 main duties 

10 actions trustee boards need to take to ensure good safeguarding governance (2018)

The essential trustee: what you need to know, what you need to do (May 2018) 

Regulatory and Risk Framework Feb 2018)

Strategy for dealing with safeguarding issues in charities (Dec 2017)

Tackling abuse and mismanagement in your charity (Sept 2017)

How to report a serious incident in your charity (Sept. 2017) and Table of examples Deciding what to report

 Safeguarding - the role of other agencies (2017)                     

Chapter

 

The Dean

 

Governing Body

Dean

 

 

 

Primary responsibility head of the charity: The Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford of the Foundation of King Henry VIII 

and its constituent parts:

  • Christ Church Cathedral
  • Christ Church Cathedral School
  • Christ Church College

 

Chair of Chapter: receiving the CCC Annual Safeguarding Report

 

Be familiar with relevant documentation (see next column)

 

Undertake required training

 

CCC Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements

 

Charity Commission:

Essential Trustee: 6 main duties 

10 actions trustee boards need to take to ensure good safeguarding governance (2018)

The essential trustee: what you need to know, what you need to do (May 2018) 

Regulatory and Risk Framework Feb 2018)

Strategy for dealing with safeguarding issues in charities (Dec 2017)

Tackling abuse and mismanagement in your charity (Sept 2017)

How to report a serious incident in your charity (Sept. 2017) and Table of examples Deciding what to report

 Safeguarding - the role of other agencies (2017)                     

Chapter

 

Governing Body

Other relevant organisations or groups (e.g: Cathedral Singers, Visiting Choirs) would be expected to have their own safeguarding arrangements, policies and procedures)

NB: Specific role descriptions and/or terms of reference to be developed as required.

Agreement with the Diocese of Oxford regarding joint safeguarding arrangements

An agreement has been made with the Diocese of Oxford for the Diocesan Safeguarding Officer to sit on the Cathedral Safeguarding Advisory Panel and the Cathedral Secretary to sit on the Diocesan Independent Safeguarding Panel.

The current incumbents of these roles are:

Appendix C) Essential knowledge: definitions, ‘contextual’ safeguarding (including radicalisation etc.), signs and symptoms

a) Focusing on children and young people

b) Focusing on vulnerable adults
 

a) Focusing on children and young people

Working Together to Safeguard Children and Young People (2018)

Glossary (p.103 to 107) including:   

Children

Anyone who has not yet reached their 18th birthday. The fact that a child has reached 16 years of age, is living independently or is in further education, is a member of the armed forces, is in hospital or in custody in the secure estate, does not change their status or entitlements to services or protection.

Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children 

Defined for the purposes of this guidance as: a. protecting children from maltreatment b. preventing impairment of children's health or development c. ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care d. taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes.

Child protection

Part of safeguarding and promoting welfare. This refers to the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering, or are likely to suffer, significant harm. 

Abuse   

A form of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting by those known to them or, more rarely, by others. Abuse can take place wholly online, or technology may be used to facilitate offline abuse. Children may be abused by an adult or adults, or another child or children. 

Physical abuse  A form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

Emotional abuse  The persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability, as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyber bullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, though it may occur alone. 

Sexual abuse Involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example, rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse Sexual abuse can take place online, and technology can be used to facilitate offline abuse. Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children.

Child sexual exploitation Child sexual exploitation is a form of child sexual abuse. It occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18 into sexual activity (a) in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or (b) for the financial advantage or increased status of the perpetrator. The victim may have been sexually exploited even if the sexual activity appears consensual. Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can also occur through the use of technology.

Neglect  The persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to: a. provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment) b. protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger c. ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate caregivers) d. ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

Extremism   Extremism goes beyond terrorism and includes people who target the vulnerable – including the young – by seeking to sow division between communities on the basis of race, faith or denomination; justify discrimination towards women and girls; persuade others that minorities are inferior; or argue against the primacy of democracy and the rule of law in our society. Extremism is defined in the Counter Extremism Strategy 2015 as the vocal or active opposition to our fundamental values, including the rule of law, individual liberty and the mutual respect and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs. We also regard calls for the death of members of our armed forces as extremist.

Local authority designated officer County level and unitary local authorities should ensure that allegations against people who work with children are not dealt with in isolation. Any action necessary to address corresponding welfare concerns in relation to the child or children involved should be taken without delay and in a coordinated manner. Local authorities should, in addition, have designated a particular officer, or team of officers (either as part of multi-agency arrangements or otherwise), to be involved in the management and oversight of allegations against people who work with children. Any such officer, or team of officers, should be sufficiently qualified and experienced to be able to fulfil this role effectively, for example qualified social workers. Any new appointments to such a role, other than current or former designated officers moving between local authorities, should be qualified social workers. Arrangements should be put in place to ensure that any allegations about those who work with children are passed to the designated officer, or team of officers, without delay.

Safeguarding partners  A safeguarding partner in relation to a local authority area in England is defined under the Children Act 2004 as: (a) the local authority, (b) a clinical commissioning group for an area any part of which falls within the local authority area, and (c) the chief officer of police for an area any part of which falls within the local authority area. The three safeguarding partners should agree on ways to co-ordinate their safeguarding services; act as a strategic leadership group in supporting and engaging others; and implement local and national learning including from serious child safeguarding incidents. To fulfil this role, the three safeguarding partners must set out how they will work together and with any relevant agencies as well as arrangements for conducting local reviews.

Child criminal exploitation  As set out in the Serious Violence Strategy, published by the Home Office, where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, control, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18 into any criminal activity (a) in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or (b) for the financial or other advantage of the perpetrator or facilitator and/or (c) through violence or the threat of violence. The victim may have been criminally exploited even if the activity appears consensual. Child criminal exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can also occur through the use of technology.

Peer on Peer Abuse  (Keeping Children Safe in Education 2019. p. 9) all staff should be aware that children can abuse other children (often referred to as peer on peer abuse). This is most likely to include, but may not be limited to:

  • bullying (including cyberbullying);

  • physical abuse such as hitting, kicking, shaking, biting, hair pulling, or otherwise causing physical harm;

  • sexual violence, such as rape, assault by penetration and sexual assault;

  • sexual harassment, such as sexual comments, remarks, jokes and online sexual harassment, which may be stand-alone or part of a broader pattern of abuse;

  • upskirting, typically involves taking a picture under a person’s clothing without them knowing, with the intention of viewing their genitals or buttocks to obtain sexual gratification, or cause the victim humiliation, distress or alarm;

  • sexting (also known as youth produced sexual imagery); and

  • initiation/hazing type violence and rituals.

Contextual safeguarding (p. 23)

Contextual safeguarding   As well as threats to the welfare of children from within their families, children may be vulnerable to abuse or exploitation from outside their families. These extra-familial threats might arise at school and other educational establishments, from within peer groups, or more widely from within the wider community and/or online. These threats can take a variety of different forms and children can be vulnerable to multiple threats, including: exploitation by criminal gangs and organised crime groups such as county lines; trafficking, online abuse; sexual exploitation and the influences of extremism leading to radicalisation. Extremist groups make use of the internet to radicalise and recruit and to promote extremist materials. Any potential harmful effects to individuals identified as vulnerable to extremist ideologies or being drawn into terrorism should also be considered.

Links (p.108 – 111)

Hypertext links from Working Together 2018 to other guidance and supporting publications, including:

  • Care of unaccompanied migrant children and child victims of modern slavery

  • Child sexual exploitation: definition and guide for practitioners

  • Listening to and involving children and young people Department for Education and Home Office

  • Mandatory reporting of female genital mutilation: procedural information Department for Education and Home Office

  • Multi-agency statutory guidance on female genital mutilation Department for Education, Department of Health and Social Care, and Home Office

  • National action plan to tackle child abuse linked to faith or belief

  • Pathways to harm, pathways to protection: a triennial analysis of serious case reviews, 2011 to 2014

  • Preventing and tackling bullying

  • Safeguarding children Department for Education

  • What to do if you're worried a child is being abused: advice for practitioners

  • Channel Duty guidance - Protecting vulnerable people from being drawn into terrorism Home Office

  • Criminal exploitation of children and vulnerable adults: county lines Home Office

  • Cyber Aware National Cyber Security Centre

  • DBS barring referral guidance Disclosure and Barring Service

  • Developing local substance misuse safeguarding protocols Public Health England

  • Disclosure and Barring Services Disclosure and Barring Service

  • Female Genital Mutilation Protection Orders: factsheet Home Office

  • Forced marriage Foreign & Commonwealth Office and Home Office

  • Indecent images of children guidance for young people Home Office

  • Mental Health Act 1983 Code of Practice: Guidance on the visiting of psychiatric patients by children Department of Health

  • Mental Health Act 1983 Code of Practice: Guidance on the visiting of psychiatric patients by children Department of Health

  • Missing Children and Adults - A Cross Government Strategy Home Office

  • Modern slavery Act statutory guidance Home Office

  • Multi-agency public protection arrangements (MAPPA) Ministry of Justice, National Offender Management Service, and HM Prison Service

  • Radicalisation - Prevent Strategy Home Office

  • Violence against women and girls Home Office

  • NICE guideline on child abuse and neglect NICE

NB: If it is considered that any of these publications and guidance documents would be of potential help in understanding and responding effectively to a safeguarding matter that has arisen, then following the links from Working Together 2018 (p.108-113) is the best way to access them and to ensure that the latest versions are used.     

‘Signs and symptoms’

Understanding and identifying abuse and neglect from What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused (2015) also linked from Working Together 2018

Guiding principles

1. No matter where you work, you are likely to encounter children during the course of your normal working activities. You are in a unique position to be able to observe signs of abuse or neglect, or changes in behaviour which may indicate a child may be being abused or neglected.

2. You should make sure that you are alert to the signs of abuse and neglect, that you question the behaviour of children and parents/carers and don’t necessarily take what you are told at face value. You should make sure you know where to turn to if you need to ask for help, and that you refer to children’s social care or to the police, if you suspect that a child is at risk of harm or is immediate danger.  

3. You should make sure that you understand and work within the local multi-agency safeguarding arrangements that are in place in your area. In doing so, you should be guided by the following key principles:

  • children have a right to be safe and should be protected from all forms of abuse and neglect;

  • safeguarding children is everyone’s responsibility;

  • it is better to help children as early as possible, before issues escalate and become more damaging; and

  • children and families are best supported and protected when there is a coordinated response from all relevant agencies.

4. You should not let other considerations, like the fear of damaging relationships with adults, get in the way of protecting children from abuse and neglect. If you think that referral to children’s social care is necessary, you should view it as the beginning of a process of inquiry, not as an accusation. 

Understanding and identifying abuse and neglect

5. Abuse and neglect are forms of maltreatment – a person may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm.

6. Child welfare concerns may arise in many different contexts, and can vary greatly in terms of their nature and seriousness. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting, by those known to them or by a stranger, including, via the internet. In the case of female genital mutilation, children may be taken out of the country to be abused. They may be abused by an adult or adults, or another child or children. An abused child will often experience more than one type of abuse, as well as other difficulties in their lives. Abuse and neglect can happen over a period of time, but can also be a one-off event. Child abuse and neglect can have major long-term impacts on all aspects of a child's health, development and well-being.

 7. The warning signs and symptoms of child abuse and neglect can vary from child to child. Disabled children may be especially vulnerable to abuse, including because they may have an impaired capacity to resist or avoid abuse. They may have speech, language and communication needs which may make it difficult to tell others what is happening. Children also develop and mature at different rates so what appears to be worrying for a younger child might be normal behaviour for an older child. Parental behaviours may also indicate child abuse or neglect, so you should also be alert to parent-child interactions which are concerning and other parental behaviours. This could include parents who are under the influence of drugs or alcohol or if there is a sudden change in their mental health. By understanding the warning signs, you can respond to problems as early as possible and provide the right support and services for the child and their family. It is important to recognise that a warning sign doesn’t automatically mean a child is being abused.

8. There are a number of warning indicators which might suggest that a child may be being abused or neglected.  Some of the following signs might be indicators of abuse or neglect: 

  • Children whose behaviour changes – they may become aggressive, challenging, disruptive, withdrawn or clingy, or they might have difficulty sleeping or start wetting the bed;
  • Children with clothes which are ill-fitting and/or dirty;
  • Children with consistently poor hygiene;
  • Children who make strong efforts to avoid specific family members or friends, without an obvious reason;
  • Children who don’t want to change clothes in front of others or participate in physical activities;
  • Children who are having problems at school, for example, a sudden lack of concentration and learning or they appear to be tired and hungry;
  • Children who talk about being left home alone, with inappropriate carers or with strangers;
  • Children who reach developmental milestones, such as learning to speak or walk, late, with no medical reason;
  • Children who are regularly missing from school or education;
  • Children who are reluctant to go home after school;
  • Children with poor school attendance and punctuality, or who are consistently late being picked up;
  • Parents who are dismissive and non-responsive to practitioners’ concerns;
  • Parents who collect their children from school when drunk, or under the influence of drugs;
  • Children who drink alcohol regularly from an early age;
  • Children who are concerned for younger siblings without explaining why;
  • Children who talk about running away; and
  • Children who shy away from being touched or flinch at sudden movements

Some of the following signs may be indicators of physical abuse: 

  • Children with frequent injuries;
  • Children with unexplained or unusual fractures or broken bones; and
  • Children with unexplained: bruises or cuts; burns or scalds; or bite marks.

Some of the following signs may be indicators of emotional abuse:

  • Children who are excessively withdrawn, fearful, or anxious about doing something wrong;
  • Parents or carers who withdraw their attention from their child, giving the child the ‘cold shoulder’;
  • Parents or carers blaming their problems on their child; and
  • Parents or carers who humiliate their child, for example, by name-calling or making negative comparisons.

Some of the following signs may be indicators of sexual abuse:

  • Children who display knowledge or interest in sexual acts inappropriate to their age;
  • Children who use sexual language or have sexual knowledge that you wouldn’t expect them to have;
  • Children who ask others to behave sexually or play sexual games; and
  • Children with physical sexual health problems, including soreness in the genital and anal areas, sexually transmitted infections or underage pregnancy.

Some of the following signs may be indicators of sexual exploitation:

  • Children who appear with unexplained gifts or new possessions;
  • Children who associate with other young people involved in exploitation;
  • Children who have older boyfriends or girlfriends;
  • Children who suffer from sexually transmitted infections or become pregnant;
  • Children who suffer from changes in emotional well-being;
  • Children who misuse drugs and alcohol;
  • Children who go missing for periods of time or regularly come home late; and
  • Children who regularly miss school or education or don’t take part in education.

Some of the following signs may be indicators of neglect:

  • Children who are living in a home that is indisputably dirty or unsafe;
  • Children who are left hungry or dirty;
  • Children who are left without adequate clothing, e.g. not having a winter coat;
  • Children who are living in dangerous conditions, i.e. around drugs, alcohol or violence;
  • Children who are often angry, aggressive or self-harm;
  • Children who fail to receive basic health care; and
  • Parents who fail to seek medical treatment when their children are ill or are injured.
     

b) Focusing on adults

Care and Support Statutory guidance (2018) from section 14: Safeguarding

 What constitutes abuse and neglect?

14.16 This section considers the different types and patterns of abuse and neglect and the different circumstances in which they may take place. This is not intended to be an exhaustive list but an illustrative guide as to the sort of behaviour which could give rise to a safeguarding concern.

Physical abuse including:

  • assault
  • hitting
  • slapping
  • pushing
  • misuse of medication
  • restraint
  • inappropriate physical sanctions

Domestic violence including:

  • psychological
  • physical
  • sexual
  • financial
  • emotional abuse
  • so called ‘honour’ based violence

Sexual abuse including:

  • rape
  • indecent exposure
  • sexual harassment
  • inappropriate looking or touching
  • sexual teasing or innuendo
  • sexual photography
  • subjection to pornography or witnessing sexual acts
  • indecent exposure
  • sexual assault
  • sexual acts to which the adult has not consented or was pressured into consenting

Psychological abuse including:

  • emotional abuse
  • threats of harm or abandonment
  • deprivation of contact
  • humiliation
  • blaming
  • controlling
  • intimidation
  • coercion
  • harassment
  • verbal abuse
  • cyber bullying
  • isolation
  • unreasonable and unjustified withdrawal of services or supportive networks

Financial or material abuse including:

  • theft
  • fraud
  • internet scamming
  • coercion in relation to an adult’s financial affairs or arrangements, including in connection with wills, property, inheritance or financial transactions
  • the misuse or misappropriation of property, possessions or benefits

Modern slavery encompasses:

  • slavery
  • human trafficking
  • forced labour and domestic servitude.
  • traffickers and slave masters using whatever means they have at their disposal to coerce, deceive and force individuals into a life of abuse, servitude and inhumane treatment

Discriminatory abuse including forms of:

  • harassment
  • slurs or similar treatment because of
  • race
  • gender and gender identity
  • age
  • disability
  • sexual orientation
  • religion
  • Read Discrimination: your rights for further information.

Neglect and acts of omission including:

  • ignoring medical emotional or physical care needs
  • failure to provide access to appropriate health, care and support or educational services
  • the withholding of the necessities of life, such as medication, adequate nutrition and heating.

Appendix D) Templates from Practice Guidance: Responding to, assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers 2017)

Initial Case Summary

(see p.82 of the practice guidance for the template/proforma)                         

To include:

Subject of Assessment:

Contact Details:

Parish/Cathedral:

Diocese:

Diocesan Reference:

Allegation Details:

  • Summary of the nature and circumstances of the concern or allegation (including date range of when the abuse is alleged to have happened)
  • Sole respondent or co- respondent?
  • Respondent’s initial response 
  • Victim/survivor Impact – views of concern or allegation(s)

Ministry Issues to be considered immediately:

  • Has the concern or allegation continued over a significant period; Frequency and severity of allegation?
  • What is the number of victims/survivors, including their gender and age range known at this stage?
  • Any other previous concerns or allegations?
  • Is there any evidence to support the concerns or allegations?
  • Respondent’s attitude to concerns/allegations and victim/survivors?
  • What is the respondent’s role in the Church?
  • What access to children, young people and/or vulnerable adults do they have (both children, young people and/or vulnerable adults within Church and in other professions/agencies/voluntary organisations)?   Can they continue to work in public?  Detail what they can/cannot do.
  • Are there other contributory factors which may increase risk (e.g. alcohol, accommodation, refusing to comply with safeguarding process etc.)?
  • Are there any issues with the respondent’s accommodation?
  • Who has the respondent shared information about the concern or allegations with?
  • What action has the respondent taken to protect themselves or others?

Protective Factors

  • What positive relationships/support network does the respondent have? 
  • What external supports has the respondent put in place themselves (personal/environmental)?

Restrictions on ministry/role required

Completed By

Role

Date


Case Management Update Tool

(see p.88 of the practice guidance for the template/proforma)

Details of Respondent:

Name:

DOB:

Age:

Role in Church i.e. ordained etc.:

Address:

Contact details (telephone / email):

Nature of Concern or Allegation:  Dates / age / gender / broad outline of allegation / frequency / number of alleged victims etc. Sole respondent or co- respondent?

Response to Concern or Allegation (both from the respondent and the statutory agencies)

Legal Status:

  • Convictions
  • Investigation in process – including bail conditions
  • Awaiting Crown Prosecution Service decision
  • No complaint to Police
  • Outcome of investigation by Social Care
  • Finding of a professional body such as the Church of England, Armed Forces, British Medical Association

Status of Ministry/Role

Sex Offender Registration / Civil Orders

  • Yes/No
  • Duration
  • Conditions

Agencies involved in management and support Include details of all relevant persons within the statutory agencies and their contact details – (Police, Probation, Social Care etc.)

Risk detail: 

  • What is the risk?
  • To whom is there a risk?
  • When is it most likely to happen?
  • What are the triggers for an increase in risk?

Monitoring arrangements

  • Frequency
  • By Whom

Review date


Appendix E) Charity Commission: 10 actions trustee boards need to take to ensure good safeguarding governance (2018)

Safeguarding should be a key governance priority for all charities [Charity Commission for England and Wales]

Ensure your charity has an adequate safeguarding policy, code of conduct and any other safeguarding procedures. Regularly review and update the policy and procedures to ensure they are fit for purpose.
Identify possible risks to your beneficiaries or to anyone else connected to your charity and any emerging risks on the horizon.
Consider how to improve the safeguarding culture within your charity.
Ensure that everyone involved with the charity knows how to recognise, respond to, report and record a safeguarding concern.
Ensure people know how to raise a safeguarding concern.
Regularly evaluate any safeguarding training provided, ensuring it is current and relevant.
Review which posts within the charity can and must have a DBS check from the Disclosure and Barring Service.
Have a risk assessment process in place for posts which do not qualify for a DBS check, but which still have contact with children or adults at risk.
Periodically review your safeguarding policy and procedures, learning from any serious incident or 'near miss'.
If you work overseas, find out what different checks and due diligence you need to carry out in different geographical areas of operation.

Appendix F) Codes of Conduct for Staff and Visitors

  1. Core principles from: Promoting a Safer Church – Safeguarding policy statement for children, young people and adults (2017)
     
    • The welfare of the child, young person and vulnerable adult is paramount
    • Integrity, respect and listening to all
    • Transparency and openness
    • Accountability
    • Collaboration with key statutory authorities and other partners
    • Use of professional safeguarding advice and support both inside and outside the Church
    • A commitment to the prevention of abuse
    • The active management of risk
    • Promoting a culture of informed vigilance
    • Regular evaluation to ensure best practice.
       
  2. Clergy: Guidelines for the Professional Conduct of the Clergy
     
  3. Guidance for Safer Working Practice: Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (2015)  Safer Recruitment Consortium

Appendix G) Christ Church Cathedral School Additional Safeguarding Children Procedures Pertaining to the Music Department 2010, revised 2020

CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL MUSIC DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING THE CATHEDRAL CHOIR Additional Safeguarding Children Procedures Pertaining to the Music Department 2010 revised 2020

CONTENTS 

1.  General Introduction  

2.  Procedures to be followed by all members of the Music Department  

3.  The care and supervision of choristers in the Cathedral  

3.1      The Weekly Timetable  

3.2      Supervision in the Cathedral  

3.3      Illness in the Cathedral  

3.4      Vocal Health  

3.5      Practical arrangements  

3.6      Special services & additional commitments  

3.7      External engagements  

3.8      Tours  

 1. General Introduction  

The Music Department has a responsibility to provide for the care and supervision of the choristers when they are engaged in choir duties and are present in the Cathedral.  The Music Department adheres to the safeguarding policy of Christ Church Cathedral School where the Christ Church Cathedral Choir choristers are pupils, with which this policy is consistent. This policy and that of the Cathedral School have been adopted by the Dean and Canons of Christ Church. Frideswide Voices choristers are not pupils at the Cathedral School.

In order to create an environment in which children are safe from harm and/or abuse while engaged in activities related to their role as choristers, the following steps are taken:  

  • All members of the Music Department (the Organist, Sub Organist, Organ Scholars, Director of Frideswide Voices, Lay Clerks and singing teachers) and other Frideswide Voices staff are subject to Enhanced Criminal Records checks with the Disclosure and Barring Service. 
  • All members of the Music Department are familiar with the safeguarding children policies of the Cathedral School and the Cathedral and have a commitment to follow the guidelines and procedures where concerns are raised about a child’s welfare.  
  • A commitment to the overall welfare of the chorister is shared by all members of the Music Department.  
  • Through close liaison between the School and the Music Department (in the form of regular weekly meetings between the Organist and the Headmaster and through the dual role played by other staff in Cathedral and School), there is a constant awareness of the overall demands created by the combination of study, singing and other activities in the choristers’ timetable. 

 2. Procedures to be followed by all members of the Music Department  

All members of the Music Department are in regular contact with children, and may be in a position to detect early symptoms of possible abuse at any time.  In voicing concern, staff should not feel that they are necessarily starting formal procedures.  The criterion should be that they have grounds for reasonable suspicion.    

 Allegations of abuse against any adults holding positions of responsibility in the Cathedral or in the Cathedral School will be treated very seriously.    

Members of the Music Department should report any concerns to the Organist, who should in turn report these to the School’s Designated Safeguarding Lead (The Headmaster) (or in the instance of a complaint against the Organist, they should report directly to the School’s DSL (The Headmaster) or the Cathedral’s DSL, The Revd Canon Graham Ward.    

 Every member of the Music Department has an obligation to report any concerns he/she may have concerning the welfare of a chorister, including any disclosures that may be made by a child.   Suspicion of abuse /disclosures by children of abuse  

The procedures to be followed are set out in detail in the Child Protection Policy and Procedures of the Cathedral School.  These include the observance of strict confidentiality, the keeping of notes on remarks made by children and parents, and, where necessary, the involvement of the Oxfordshire Safeguarding Children’s Board or the police.  

 All adults who come into regular contact with children should be aware of their vulnerability and do their best to avoid misunderstanding.  

 3. The Care and Supervision of Choristers in the Cathedral  

 3.1 The Weekly Timetable  

The demands made on the time of the choristers are considerable and this should be borne in mind at all times. 

Where it is felt that a chorister is having trouble coping with the exigencies of his timetable the Organist may consult the Director of Studies, the Housemaster or the Headmaster regarding possible strategies which might be followed to make the workload more bearable.    During a normal week, the choristers rehearse for an hour each weekday morning, and for 45 minutes before each Evensong on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. 

The singing timetable for a normal week is outlined below:    

Day

Time

Activity

Venue

Monday

7:55 – 8:40 am

Rehearsal

Chapter Parlour

 

 

 

 

Tuesday

7.55 – 8.55 am

Rehearsal

Chapter Parlour

5.00 – 5.45 pm

Rehearsal

Cathedral

5.45 pm

Chorister snack

Priory Room

6.05 – c.6.50 pm

Evensong

Cathedral

7.00 pm

Supper 

School

 

 

 

 

Wednesday

7:55 – 8:55 am

Rehearsal

Chapter Parlour

 

 

 

 

Thursday

7.55 – 8.55 am

Rehearsal

Chapter Parlour

5.00 – 5.45 pm

Rehearsal

Cathedral

5.45 pm

Chorister snack

Priory Room

6.05 – c.6.50 pm

Evensong

Cathedral

7.00 pm

Supper 

School

 

 

 

 

Friday

7.55 – 8.55 am 

Rehearsal

Chapter Parlour

5.00 – 5.45 pm 

Rehearsal

Cathedral

5.45 pm   

Chorister snack

Priory Room

6.05 – c.6.50 pm 

Evensong

Cathedral

7.00 pm  

Supper 

School

 

 

 

 

Saturday

8:30 – 9:30 am 

Rehearsal

Chapter Parlour

4.45 – 5.45 pm 

Rehearsal

Cathedral

5.45 pm   

Chorister snack

Priory Room

6.05 – c.6.50 pm 

Evensong

Cathedral

7.00 pm  

Supper 

School

 

 

 

 

Sunday

9:15-9:40/9:50-10 am

Rehearsal

Chapter Parlour

10 am

Matins

Cathedral

c. 11 am

Break, drink & snack

Priory Room

11.20 – 12.30 pm

Eucharist

Cathedral

1.00 pm

Lunch

School

5.00 – 5.45 pm 

Rehearsal

Cathedral

6.05 pm 

Evensong

Cathedral

7.00 pm  

Supper 

School

 

The average week consists of approximately 10 1/2 hours of rehearsal and approximately 6 ¾ hours of services per week, totalling 17 1/4 hours. The maximum commitment recommended by the Choir Schools’ Association is 22 hours, and the Headmaster and the Organist work together to ensure that the boys’ commitments never exceed levels regarded as acceptable nationally.  

3.2 Supervision in the Cathedral  

The choristers are never left unsupervised anywhere in the Cathedral.  

When an individual chorister is left alone with a member of the Music Department in the Cathedral for solo preparation, an organ lesson etc. another adult in the building will always be notified.  This is likely to be the person taking the main rehearsal but if it is at another time, the verger would be the obvious choice. 

The Chapter Parlour is very occasionally used for sectional rehearsals or solo preparation.  In these instances, the Organist taking the rehearsal will always inform another member of staff.     

The choristers are escorted from the School to the Chapter Parlour for all rehearsals and performances by a member of staff from the Cathedral School.  At the end of Evensong, they are escorted from the Cathedral to the School by a member of the Cathedral music staff. This involves walking across the road at St Aldates. The escort wears a high-visibility jacket and carries a ‘lollipop’ sign, and receives training from the Cathedral School in escorting children and stopping traffic.  

3.3 Illness in the Cathedral  

If a chorister is taken ill during a service and has to leave the Choir Stalls, if the duty member of school staff is present, they will assist him and escort him back to the School where he will be looked after by matron. In the absence of school staff, the duty verger will assist the chorister and phone the school and ask for the Matron on duty to collect the child and escort him back to the school, if necessary.   

If a chorister is taken ill during a rehearsal, he will be escorted back to the School by another member of the Music Department where one is present.  If no adult other than the Duty Organist is present to escort the child, the organist taking the rehearsal will telephone the school in order that someone may come to collect the child.    

3.4 Vocal Health  

If a chorister feels uncomfortable singing or has throat problems that he believes will affect his singing, he should present himself to the duty Matron prior to attending choir practice.  The duty Matron will record boys as ‘With Care’ for medical reasons or, if she considers it necessary, will place the boys ‘Off Singing’.  The ‘With Care’ system exists to make the organist on duty aware of a small (or potential) problem, leaving the boy able to decide how much he feels able to contribute to the rehearsal under the watchful eye of the Duty Organist.  In turn, the Duty Organist may choose to put a boy off singing if he feels that his contribution to the rehearsal is being hampered by a vocal or health problem.  Records are kept of health complaints and issues of concern on a vocal level, and where it is felt that a boy is consistently struggling or unable to fulfil his role as a chorister further investigation will be made, involving consultation with parents and (where necessary) medical specialists.   Where other issues, personal or emotional, may affect the ability of a boy to fulfil his duties as a chorister, the Housemaster will inform the Organist and discussions will take place between the relevant parties in order to consider possible solutions.  

Should a chorister’s voice change before the conclusion of his school career, the Director of Music will consult the Headmaster in order to decide at which point the boy should cease his participation in the daily routine of the choir.  The School will make arrangements with his parents regarding boarding and it may be possible for the child in question to continue his associations with the Cathedral through involvement in the choir, by singing in the back line, page turning, etc. The boy’s vocal health must be of paramount importance and no boy will be expected to sing if he finds it uncomfortable to do so.  At all times it is important for adults to remember the emotional difficulties often encountered by boys as they experience this physical change, and to act with the greatest possible sensitivity to the individual’s needs.  

3.5 Practical Arrangements  

Public toilets and semi-public toilets are situated in the Cloisters and Priory Room, respectively.  Choristers may use these facilities at any time during rehearsals with the permission of the member of staff conducting the rehearsal, and accompanied by a senior chorister.  Because of the lack of private facilities, the boys are encouraged to use the toilets in school before coming to the cathedral.   

 3.6 External engagements

Throughout the year the choristers are asked to participate in a number of concerts, recording sessions and special events, both in and outside the Cathedral. The Organist seeks approval for such events from the Headmaster and the Dean and Chapter. If this is given, it is not necessary to seek parental approval as the School acts ‘in loco parentis’ during term-time. 

The goodwill of parents is sought at all times, however, and should a parent have any queries regarding the arrangements for external events (of which they will always be notified by the Organist), they should feel free to contact the Headmaster or the PA to the Organist.     

When the choristers are required to travel to a venue other than the Cathedral or the Cathedral School for a rehearsal, concert or special event, they will be accompanied by chaperones from the Cathedral Music Department and School. When the Cathedral Music Department is involved in arranging for an individual chorister to perform in an external concert or event, the practicalities concerning chaperoning, flexibility of choir commitments, coaching and supervision etc. will be made by the Music Department in consultation with the School and the parents of the boy in question.  

Travel to concerts outside Oxford is by coach.  In most cases toilet facilities are requested and the coach company’s drivers have DBS clearance.  

Two members of staff from Christ Church Cathedral School accompany the choristers to the concert and in addition the Organist and the Sub Organist (if he is performing in the concert) are designated chaperones.  The provision of a hot meal is a standard requirement within the contract for each concert.   

 In the rare case of overnight accommodation being required, hotel rooms are booked and two chaperones from Christ Church Cathedral School accompany the choristers.  Their room is on the same floor and within easy reach of the boys’ rooms.  

The Cathedral undertakes a risk assessment prior to each external engagement which will be approved by the Headmaster. 

 3.7 Tours   

Tours which involve extended travelling and overnight stays happen on an occasional basis, and, although the boys’ involvement forms part of the chorister contract, parental consent is requested in these circumstances.  

Upon a tour being organised, detailed arrangements, guidelines and procedures will be issued.  These will include references to provision of adequate medical care, adult supervision, awareness of dietary requirements, hotel arrangements, emergency contact details etc.  

For overseas tours, a licence is obtained for each tour through the City of Westminster Magistrates’ Court under the requirements of Young Persons Employment Abroad (The Children (Performances) (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 1998).     

The application goes before a District Judge and its purpose is to satisfy ‘that the children are going out of the United Kingdom in order to fulfil the particular engagement…that the proper provision has been made to secure the health, kind treatment, and adequate supervision of the children whilst abroad and their return to the United Kingdom at the expiration or revocation of the licence; and that a copy of contract of employment or other document, showing the terms and conditions of employment, has been furnished to the parents of the children’    In addition to the application form (which specifies travel and accommodation details) the following documentation is required:   

1. A schedule giving the full names of each child and the names and addresses of their parents. 

2. A copy of the contract regarding the performances on the tour 

3. A copy of the birth certificate of the fitness of each child

4. A medical certificate of the fitness of each child 

5. A consent in writing signed by both parents of each child 

6. A consent in writing from the Headmaster 

7. A copy of the Notice to Police  

A copy of the application together with the Notice to Police is sent to the Thames Valley Police Disclosure Unit for screening and authorisation prior to the application going before the Judge.  

The Organist is required to report to a designated UK Embassy or Consulate whilst on the tour.  Both the Police and the Magistrates’ Court are contacted upon return to the UK and in addition the Magistrates’ Court is given a schedule of rehearsals, performances, rest and meal times on concert days.    Travel insurance is taken out for each boy on the tour and a summary of the policy is circulated to the parents.  The full policy is available for inspection if necessary.   

The Choristers are normally accommodated in hotels.  The Chaperones’ rooms are always on the same floor and within easy reach of the boys’ rooms. There are also measures designed to ensure the safety of the pupils written into contracts with Hotels.  Occasionally the boys will stay with host families. If this is the case, the organist will seek an assurance from the hosting organisation that the families are known to them and have been vetted and if the hosting organisation has a Safeguarding document, it will be checked.

In addition a letter will be sent to the hosts politely explaining certain procedures, most important of which is that the boys should have access to a phone which will enable them to contact School and Cathedral staff. The boys will be seen by staff every day. Parents will be informed of the intention to stay with host families.

At least two members of Christ Church Cathedral staff accompany the boys on all tours as chaperones.  In addition, the Organist and the Sub Organist (if he is on the tour) are designated chaperones.   

The Cathedral undertakes a risk assessment prior to each tour which is then approved by the Headmaster.


Appendix H)  Frideswide Voices Additional Safeguarding Children Procedures Pertaining to the Music Department

CONTENTS 

1.  General Introduction  

2.  Procedures to be followed by all members of the Music Department  

3.  The care and supervision of choristers in the Cathedral  

3.1      The Weekly Timetable  

3.2      Supervision in the Cathedral  

3.3      Illness in the Cathedral  

3.4      Vocal Health  

3.5      Practical arrangements  

3.6      Special services & additional commitments  

3.7      External engagements  

3.8      Tours  

 1. General Introduction  

The Music Department has a responsibility to provide for the care and supervision of the choristers when they are engaged in choir duties and are present in the Cathedral.

In order to create an environment in which children are safe from harm and/or abuse while engaged in activities related to their role as choristers, the following steps are taken:  

  • All members of the Music Department (the Organist, Sub Organist, Director of Frideswide Voices (DFV), Organ Scholars, Lay Clerks and singing teachers) and other Frideswide Voices staff are subject to Enhanced Criminal Records checks with the Disclosure and Barring Service. 
  • All members of the Music Department and other Frideswide Voices Staff had read and understood the Christ Church Cathedral Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements document and have a commitment to follow the guidelines and procedures where concerns are raised about a child’s welfare.  
  • Frideswide Voices has its own Designated Safeguarding Lead (FV DSL), who reports to the Cathedral Safeguarding Leads, and sits on the Safeguarding Sub Committee. Helen Smee (DFV) is the Frideswide Voices DSL.
  • A commitment to the overall welfare of the chorister is shared by all members of the Music Department.  
  • Those involved in the recruitment of FV staff attend Safer Recruitment training or ensure that at least one panel member is Safer Recruitment trained.

2. Procedures to be followed by all members of the Music Department  

All members of the Music Department and Frideswide Voices staff are in regular contact with children and may be in a position to detect early symptoms of possible abuse at any time.  In voicing concern, staff should not feel that they are necessarily starting formal procedures.  The criterion should be that they have grounds for reasonable suspicion.    

Allegations of abuse against any adults holding positions of responsibility in the Cathedral will be treated very seriously.    

Members of the Music Department and Frideswide Voices staff should report any concerns to the Frideswide Voices DSL, Helen Smee, or the Cathedral’s DSLs, or the Chapter Safeguarding Officer,  The Revd Canon Graham Ward.    

Every member of the Music Department has an obligation to report any concerns he/she may have concerning the welfare of a chorister, including any disclosures that may be made by a child.    

The procedures to be followed are set out in detail in the Christ Church Cathedral Safeguarding Policy, Procedures and Arrangements.  These include the observance of strict confidentiality, the keeping of notes on remarks made by children and parents, and, where necessary, the involvement of the Oxfordshire Safeguarding Children’s Board or the police.  

 All adults who come into regular contact with children should be aware of their vulnerability and do their best to avoid misunderstanding.  

 3. The Care and Supervision of Choristers in the Cathedral  

 3.1 The Weekly Timetable  

The demands made on the time of the choristers should be borne in mind at all times. 

Where it is felt that a chorister is having trouble coping with the exigencies of her timetable the DFV may consult the Organist, regarding possible strategies to manage the workload.

The singing timetable for a normal week is outlined below:    

Day

Time

Activity

Venue

Monday

4.30 – 6.30 pm

Rehearsal (15 min break included)

Music Room, Chapter Parlour,

Priory Room

4.30 – 6.30 pm

One to one lessons

 

 

 

 

Wednesday

4.20 pm

Chorister snack

Priory Room

4.45 – 5.45 pm

Rehearsal

Cathedral

5.45 pm

Break

Priory Room

6.05 – c.6.50 pm

Evensong

Cathedral

 

The average week consists of approximately 3-4 hours of rehearsal and 1-2 hours of services per week, totalling 4-6 hours. The maximum commitment recommended by the Choir Schools’ Association is 22 hours.

3.2 Supervision in the Cathedral  

The choristers are never left unsupervised anywhere in the Cathedral.  

When an individual chorister is left alone with a member of the Music Department or FV staff team in the Cathedral for solo preparation, an organ lesson etc. another adult in the building will always be notified.  This is likely to be the person taking the main rehearsal or one of the duty chaperones, but if it is at another time, the verger would be the obvious choice. 

The Chapter Parlour is very occasionally used for sectional rehearsals or solo preparation.  In these instances, the DFV taking the rehearsal will always inform another member of staff.     

The choristers are escorted around Christ Church for all rehearsals and performances by a Frideswide Voices chaperone or member of the Music Department.  At the end of Evensong, they are escorted from the Cathedral by a member of Frideswide Voices music staff.

3.3 Illness in the Cathedral  

If a chorister is taken ill during a rehearsal or service in the Cathedral and has to leave the Choir Stalls, the Duty FV Chaperone will escort her out of the Cathedral where she will be looked after in the Priory Room, and if necessary her parent/guardian will be called to collect her.

If a chorister is taken ill during a rehearsal elsewhere, she will be looked after by the duty FV chaperone or nearest member of FV staff.

3.4 Vocal Health  

If a chorister feels uncomfortable singing or has throat problems that she believes will affect her singing - but is present for a rehearsal or service - she should present herself to the Director of FV or Duty Organist.  The DFV, Duty Organist or member of FV staff may place girls as ‘With Care’ for medical reasons or, if they consider it necessary, will place the girl ‘Off Singing’.  The ‘With Care’ system exists to make the organist on duty aware of a small (or potential) problem, leaving the girl able to decide how much she feels able to contribute to the rehearsal under the watchful eye of the DFV or Duty Organist.  In turn, the DFV or Duty Organist may choose to put a girl off singing if they feel that her contribution to the rehearsal is being hampered by a vocal or health problem.  Records are kept of health complaints and issues of concern on a vocal level, and where it is felt that a girl is consistently struggling or unable to fulfil her role as a chorister further investigation will be made, involving consultation with parents and (where necessary) medical specialists.   Where other issues, personal or emotional, may affect the ability of a girl to fulfil her duties as a chorister, discussions will take place between the relevant parties in order to consider possible solutions.  

The girl’s vocal and emotional health must be of paramount importance and no girl will be expected to sing if she finds it uncomfortable to do so.  

3.5 Practical Arrangements  

Public toilets and semi-public toilets are situated in the Cloisters and Priory Room, respectively.  Girls may use these facilities at any time during rehearsals with the permission of the member of staff conducting the rehearsal.

3.6 External engagements  

Throughout the year the choristers may be asked to participate in a number of concerts, recording sessions and special events, both in and outside the Cathedral.  The DFV seeks permission from the Organist and the Dean and Chapter.  Parental consent will be then be sought for events outside the usual weekly schedule. 

The goodwill of parents is sought at all times and should a parent have any queries regarding the arrangements for external events (of which they will always be notified by the DFV or Frideswide Voices Administrator), they should feel free to contact the Cathedral’s DSL, The Revd Canon Graham Ward.    

When the choristers are required to travel to a venue other than the Cathedral or the Cathedral School for a rehearsal, concert or special event, they will be accompanied by chaperones from the Cathedral Music Department or FV staff team.   When the Cathedral Music Department is involved in arranging for an individual chorister to perform in an external concert or event, the practicalities concerning chaperoning, flexibility of choir commitments, coaching and supervision etc. will be made by the Music Department and the parents of the girl in question.  

Travel to concerts outside Oxford is by usually by coach, sometimes by train.  In most cases toilet facilities are requested and the coach company’s drivers have DBS clearance.  

Two members of FV staff accompany the choristers to the concert and in addition the DFV and the Frideswide Voices Administrator are designated chaperones.   

In the rare case of overnight accommodation being required, hotel rooms are booked and two FV chaperones accompany the choristers.  Their room is on the same floor and within easy reach of the girls’ rooms.  

The Cathedral undertakes a risk assessment prior to each external engagement which will be approved by the Cathedral’s DSL, The Revd Canon Graham Ward.    

 3.7 Tours   

Tours which involve extended travelling and overnight stays may happen on an occasional basis, and parental consent is requested in these circumstances.  

Upon a tour being organised, detailed arrangements, guidelines and procedures will be issued.  These will include references to provision of adequate medical care, adult supervision, awareness of dietary requirements, hotel arrangements, emergency contact details etc.  

Appendix I) Reporting Concerns about Church Officers (staff or volunteers)[2] or others (‘whistleblowing policy’)

i) Adapted from the Christ Church Cathedral School ‘WHISTLEBLOWING’ POLICY (Adaptations are indicated by italic text)

Fundamental to our aims… is the belief that children and adults (especially vulnerable adults) should both be and feel safe. This situation is intimately linked to a culture where staff and pupils and everyone associated with the Cathedral feel that they are able to raise concerns. 

Working closely with children is fundamental to teaching in schools. Everyone is welcome at the Cathedral and where such interaction with children and adults exists, so also does the opportunity to abuse them. It is regrettably the case that, in rare instances, teachers and other staff (and Church Officers) have been found to be responsible for child abuse and adult abuse. Given their daily contact with pupils and students and members of the public in a variety of situations, staff are also vulnerable to allegations of abuse, whether deliberately or innocently false, malicious or misplaced. However, staff should avoid making their own judgements of whether an allegation is false or otherwise.

 Whilst every effort is made to ensure that the school’s and Cathedral’s practices and policies do not put children or adults at risk, there may exist matters that have been overlooked, or new situations which have developed that need challenging on safeguarding grounds.

Any member of staff may make a referral to an external agency and no-one should hesitate to take action to report concerns because of fear of possible repercussions. Any colleague who in good faith makes a report to the DSL, Cathedral Safeguarding Leads, the local Safeguarding Team or to Social Services of any concern or allegation about school or Cathedral practices or the behaviour of colleagues which is/are likely to put pupils or others at risk of abuse or other significant harm can expect immunity from retribution or disciplinary action.

Any member of staff or pupil should feel able to approach either of the Cathedral Safeguarding Leads, the DSLs or any member of the SMT (who will then pass the matter on to the Cathedral Safeguarding Leads or DSLs if appropriate) if they are feeling upset or worried. 

(CCCS has a counsellor with whom pupils can make a confidential appointment to speak about any concerns or worries they have. If a safeguarding disclosure arises then the procedure for allegations should be followed. Remember that in matters of safeguarding no one can guarantee confidentiality.)

Staff have a responsibility to speak up about safeguarding concerns.

The NSPCC whistleblowing helpline is available to staff or Cathedral officers (staff or volunteers) who do not feel able to raise concerns about Child protection failures internally. Staff can call 0800 028 0285 (lines open 8am – 8pm Monday to Friday) or e mail help@nspcc.org.uk

[2] Practice guidance: Responding to assessing and managing concerns and allegations against church officers (2017) provides this definition:A “church officer” is anyone appointed/elected by or on behalf of the Church to a post or role, whether they are ordained or lay, paid or unpaid. (footnote to p. 6)

ii) Charity Commission Guidance:

Report serious wrongdoing at a charity as a worker or volunteer (October 2018)

How the Charity Commission can help

Your information helps us determine if a charity is at risk, and how serious it is. We will make a record of your concern, and investigate those that pose the highest risk. If we investigate a concern we usually work with the trustees and the charity to help get it back on track.

We only investigate how charities are run but do not investigate any crimes ourselves. For example if you report a criminal offence you still need to tell the police so that they can investigate it.

You can also report issues to your employer - check your charity’s whistleblowing policy.

There is a different process if you want to report serious incidents:

Protection from unfair treatment at work

If you’re a charity worker and report certain types of wrongdoing, this is known as ‘whistleblowing’. Your employer must not treat you unfairly at work because you blow the whistle. If the information you report, and how you report it meets specific requirements the law will protect you.

You must:

  • be a worker, not a volunteer
  • reveal the information in the public interest
  • reveal certain types of wrongdoing
  • tell the right person or organisation

Read ‘Whistleblowing for employees’ to understand:

  • whether protection applies to your situation
  • what to do if you’re treated unfairly after whistleblowing

Get independent advice if you’re not sure you’re protected, for example from:

The Charity Commission cannot tell you if your whistleblowing disclosure is protected under the law, or give legal advice.

Report your concern to the Charity Commission

Email whistleblowing@charitycommission.gov.uk and answer these questions:

  1. What is the name of the charity? Include its registration number if it’s registered.
  2. What is your name?
  3. What is your role at the charity? If you no longer work for the charity, please tell us when you left.
  4. Are you a charity employee or a volunteer?
  5. What is your concern?
  6. What impact does it have on the people the charity helps, its assets, services, staff or reputation?
  7. Have you followed your charity’s complaints procedure or raised it with the charity’s trustees? What was the response? If you have not raised it with your charity, please explain why not.
  8. Have you contacted other organisations, like the police or HMRC? Include reference numbers, the name of who dealt with it, and their response if you have.
  9. Do you give permission to us to reveal your identity to the charity’s trustees?
  10. If you attach evidence to your email, how is it relevant to your concern?

Appendix J)   Record of Concern Form

 

Name of Child

Date

Nature of Concern

What prompted this record? (Please include dates, times, incidents, behaviours)

Background

Information that could explain child’s behaviour

Does the concern fall into one of the following categories?

 

Neglect                                                                                Sexual Abuse

 

Physical Abuse                                                                   Emotional Abuse

 

 

Signed                                                                                 Signed

(Member of staff)                                                                                 (Cathedral Designated Safeguarding Lead)

Has this information been passed to any other agencies? (Please give details) If not, please record reasons why

Appendix K) References and resources

Local Safeguarding Boards and related

Oxford Safeguarding Children Board

Oxfordshire Safeguarding Adults Board website (accessed Dec 2018)


Church of England National Safeguarding Documents

Overview and links: https://www.churchofengland.org/more/safeguarding/policy-practice-guidance  

Practice Guidance documents:

NB: This practice guidance also includes the ‘Risk assessment and management of those that may pose a known risk to children, young people or vulnerable adults within a Christian Congregation or Community’

Other documents:


Legislation and statutory guidance (England and Wales)

Children and young people (under the age of 18)        

Adults (over the age of 18)

Others of more general relevance

Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006

Disclosure and Barring Service arrangements https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/disclosure-and-barring-service/about  

  • Regulated activity in relation to children: scope. Factual note by HM Government (check date)
  • A Guide to Child Workforce Roles (see website links for latest version)
  • A Guide to Adult Workforce Roles (see website links for latest version)

Mental Capacity Act 2005

Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015

Equality Act 2010

Voyeurism (Offences) Act 2019

Revised Prevent Duty Guidance: for England and Wales (2015)  

Data Protection legislation and GDPR and related Guide to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (June 2018 – online version has ‘live’ updates and additional guidance)


Charity Commission documentation

                General information

Safeguarding and protecting people for charities and trustees (Updated October 2018)

Report serious wrongdoing at a charity as a worker or volunteer (October 2018)

Essential Trustee: 6 main duties  

The essential trustee: what you need to know, what you need to do (May 2018)

Regulatory and Risk Framework and Annex A (both Feb 2018)

Strategy for dealing with safeguarding issues in charities (Dec 2017)

Tackling abuse and mismanagement in your charity (Sept 2017) and video clip Harvey Grenville, Head of Investigations and Enforcement:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84KfdZjxSXc

How to report a serious incident in your charity (Sept. 2017) and Table of examples Deciding what to report

Safeguarding - the role of other agencies (2017)                     


Oxford University Safeguarding Code of Practice

The University Safeguarding Code of Practice includes guidance on:

These links may be followed to access the guidance. Section 4 should be consulted whenever there is a safeguarding concern that includes a university dimension.

Other links and resources

Safeguarding  and Child Protection Standards for the Voluntary and Community Sector (2019 ed). NSPCC

Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings (2015)  Safer Recruitment Consortium


April 2020

PH for CCC; JB/EN 28.03.19